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News and Opinions about MS, Health & Disability

Coimbra’s high dose vitamin D treatment for MS and other autoimmune diseases works, say patients

I have written before about vitamin D and autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. What’s more, I take a daily supplement of 5,000 IU (international units) of vitamin D3. That started when I was found to be deficient in the vitamin last October.

D3 is the main element, one of many, in an MS treatment protocol developed by Dr Cicero Coimbra, a neurologist in Brazil. As yet, as far as I am aware, the Coimbra Protocol has not been the subject of any clinical trials and so is not approved by any regulatory authority. Its claimed success rate is, though, impressive. And patients are keen to sing its praises.

This is the story of one such patient, as told by her mother Karen Bell:

My daughter has MS, diagnosed a year ago when she was 20 years old. She heard she most likely has progressive MS as MR scan showed she already has a permanent black hole in her brain.

Because my husband also has MS, I was very familiar with the disease and the probability of disability. That’s why I went into total research mode.

Coimbra

Dr Cicero Coimbra.

I kept finding stuff about vitamin D helping MS (even more than the drugs), and read tons of studies. I read about Wahls and other things. But, what made the most sense to me, from all my research, was the Coimbra Protocol.

Dr Cicero Coimbra, a neurologist and researcher in Brazil, developed his protocol using high doses of vitamin D. He has personally treated thousands of patients and is now training doctors around the world, for free.

Coimbra success rate 95%, anecdotal reports

Of the people on the protocol, 95% go into total remission and many of them recover from their disabilities, some totally. Most of the remaining 5% either didn’t follow directions or had tremendous stress in their lives. This is known to cause immune system problems.

The protocol sounded amazing and almost too good to true. Why didn’t my daughter’s neurologist know about it? I took vitamin D studies into the appointment to discuss her treatment, but he said ‘you can find studies about anything and many of them are flawed’. He didn’t even want to hear much about the protocol because it hadn’t been studied and the doctor was from Brazil. Such a closed mind!!!

He wanted to put her on Plegridy. While waiting for the insurance stuff to go through, I did more research, even had a person who speaks Portuguese look through the Facebook group I found full of patients of the protocol, and look at the YouTube videos, to try to see if this was for real. That person came back saying if they had MS, they would do it.

We became convinced that the protocol was what we wanted to do and found a doctor in the United States. We were so afraid a relapse would disable our daughter. She had already had four of them in five months, so we decided to start the Plegridy.  The plan was she would stay on it until she could start the protocol. Well, the first shot caused an allergic reaction so we said no to any drugs and decided to wait for the appointment to see the Coimbra Protocol doctor.

Vitamins, no drugs, no relapses

Long story short, my daughter started the protocol and has never had another relapse and is stronger and feels great. She is living a normal life and only has to take vitamins, no shots or other meds with side effects! As a mother, I am now confident my daughter will have a normal and wonderful life.

It is important to know that Dr Coimbra says the protocol stops MS; it is not a cure.

I am sure vitamin D has a key role to play. This is in both helping to prevent and treat MS. Coimbra’s work is as yet untested in clinical trials, but many people say it does work. So, clinical trials need to start soon.

The main problem would seem likely to be the availability of funding for such trials. After all, Big Pharma finances most trials on the way to developing new drug therapies. Unfortunately, I cannot see any of them paying for research into a protocol that doesn’t use their drugs.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Too much sunshine not good for young children or people with heat sensitivity

Having left a mainly editing and managing role in April, I now have more time to devote to writing. And, to be honest, that is where I am happiest.

Now I am writing for Medical News Today as well as paying much more attention to this blog. This had suffered through lack of time during the last year.

With more time available, I can now write articles that, before, were put on one side. And that starts today.

A news story caught my attention a couple of days ago. It was about a warning from NHS England and the Meteorological Office reminding parents that suntans on children are unhealthy.

Apparently, a survey suggests a third of parents believe, mistakenly, that going brown is good for children, But, a tan doesn’t stop the sun’s harmful UV rays. Instead, it is damaged skin trying to protect itself.

Clare Nasir, tv weather presenter and meteorologist, said: “Protecting against skin cancer isn’t something parents should leave to chance.

“UV levels are usually highest between May and September. Clouds don’t always stop UV rays, and unlike the sun’s warmth, it’s difficult to know when they may be harming you.”

Boost vitamin D but don’t overdo it

Dr Nigel Acheson, from NHS England, said although exposure to some sunlight was good for boosting vitamin D levels, people should not overdo it.

“We typically recommend that people spend no more than 10 to 15 minutes in the UK summer sun, unprotected, several times a week,” he said.

heat“People who spend more than 15 minutes in the sun on any given day, should apply sun protection factor 15 or higher.”

Nicola Smith, from Cancer Research UK, said: “There’s no such thing as a safe tan, from the sun or sunbeds.”

“While everyone needs a little bit of sun for vitamin D, most children and adults get enough from a short amount of time outside, less than it takes to burn.”

Apart from UV rays, too much sun can also hurt many of us, both with and without multiple sclerosis, who have heat sensitivity. Usually, this is caused by it being too hot, too cold or, for anyone like me, when it’s too changeable.

Top tips to avoid the sun’s heat and UV rays

British weather was too changeable for me, which is why Lisa and I moved to Spain. It gets really hot here but that’s ok for me because it’s constant.

So, what top tips are there to avoid being affected by the high summer temperature? Here’s a few:

  • Avoid extreme temperatures – If you love to be outdoors, limit your time in the sun. Go indoors to cool down. Don’t overheat or you’ll pay for it over the next few days.
  • Use cooling equipment – If you are outdoors for a time, make sure to keep cooling products available.
  • Keep yourself hydrated – Water is the best drink to fight dehydration and quench your thirst. Iced water is even better.
  • Wear lightweight clothing or clothes that breathe – Wear loose, lightweight and light coloured clothing. I recommend a light summer hat, too. That provides your own portable shade.
  • Plan ahead and remember timing is everything – If you are going to be outside, get your timing right. Avoid the hottest part of the day.

Heat sensitivity is unpleasant and makes symptoms of MS and other disabilities worse. But that is only temporary (pseudoexacerbations). The heat does not cause more damage.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

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Volunteer family carers not appreciated by government, new poll shows

carers

Those who provide unpaid care for loved ones are not appreciated enough, according to a new poll. Carers in the UK are the same as caregivers in the USA.

The online poll was designed to find what the public thinks about carers. It was run by the Multiple Sclerosis Society which says the major findings are:

  • More than 7 in 10 (74%) feel carers aren’t valued enough by society for the support they provide. This rises to 83% for those who have experience of caring.
  • The cost of care and its impact on people’s finances is the top worry for people who’ve never had a caring experience (47%). Coping with the stress of caring is the second biggest worry (43%)
  • Nearly a third (32%) who’ve never cared for someone said they would worry they didn’t have the skills or experience to become a carer.
  • Almost a quarter (23%) of those who’ve never cared said they wouldn’t know or understand what help would be available if they became a carer.

According to the society’s website: “These findings are really worrying, as we know people with MS receive a huge amount of support from family or friends.

“Our recent report on social care and the MS community in England showed 85% of people with MS received some level of unpaid care, support or assistance from family and friends in 2016.

“More than a third (36%) of people who need support told us they rely solely on unpaid care,” it said.

Care for the carers

MS Society chief executive Michelle Mitchell said: “More than 100,000 people in the UK live with MS, and we know that unpaid carers make a world of difference in helping people manage this unpredictable condition.

“We know that caring can be really difficult though, and more can be done to better recognise and support them. That’s why we’re joining other charities to urge our new government to set out its plan for how support for carers can be improved.”

Some chance! Based on the despicable record of the last government, I won’t hold my breath waiting for improvements for carers.

The new UK government is led by the same Conservative party. A party which is without care or compassion.

Disability welfare benefits were cut by the last government. There is no sign of any change of heart. The only glimmer of hope is that, under prime minister Theresa May, the Conservatives no longer have an absolute majority. There is just a chance they can be outvoted in the House of Commons.

We live in hope.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Mobility aids: Choose what’s best for you

Mobility – well, truthfully, difficulty in moving around, is something that many of us with multiple sclerosis and other disabilities must overcome.

And, for our benefit, there are numerous mobility aids on the market for us to choose. These vary from the basic walking stick, or cane, right up to the top of the range, road ready, electric power scooter.

But I want to talk about some options between those two extremes. Yes, I will restrict my comments to walkers, rollators, manual wheelchairs, electric wheelchairs, and electric scooters. You see, except for walkers, I have experience using all of them.

Standard walkers are stable, and have sturdy metal frames providing solid support. Upper body strength is required as the user lifts it off the ground every couple of steps.

Wheeled walkers have two wheels and two standard legs. This is easier to move as  the user only tilts it forward to move.

Three-wheeled rollators are ideal for using where space is limited but they don’t have facilities like a seat.

Four wheeled rollators, with two ‘steering’ wheels at the front are easy to move and have seats to use if a rest is needed. They also have baskets or other carrying capabilities. Bakes are important, especially when going up or down slopes. They can also be locked on to hold the rollators still so the user can sit safely

Manual wheelchairs come in two basic types, one where the user has to depend on caregivers to push them about. The other is where users can move themselves using the large wheels that can be self-propelled.

Electric wheelchairs add to users’ independence but are usually heavy and  need wheelchair adapted vehicles to move them about. But now there are folding electric wheelchairs that can easily fit in ordinary carsElectric scooters are available in different sizes. They also improve independence and the smallest ones can be broken down into a number of pieces to fit into cars.

I tried a self-propelled manual wheelchair from Drive Medical but found it was little use to me as I only have one good arm, so still had to rely on Lisa to push my chair. Not that she minds, but it does nothing for my independence.

Three different scooters have been tested. One was too lightweight in terms of power. One was powerful enough but just too large, and the third was just too much to break down to pack away and then reassemble to use again.

A power wheelchair came next. And that was great but it was so heavy to unload from and reload into our seven seat vehicle.

Rollators and wheelchairs

independence

Next I bought a great foldable electric wheelchair from Better Products for Disabled People – and it is wonderful. It’s so much lighter than an ordinary chair but it is still too much to unload and reload a number of times in quick succession, or if it is only for a short period of time.

rollatorsSo, this week I took delivery of a brand new four-wheeled rollator from Performance Health (formerly Patterson Medical). My verdict? It’s fantastic and yesterday it enabled me to walk to my maximum limit of about 20 yards before I sat on the built-in seat for a few minutes.  Then I got up to walk another 20 yards.

It’s easy to get out of and back into our car. Of course, for longer distances, I will continue to use my trusty wheelchair.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Excuse me, which charity does your ribbon represent?

There are only a limited number of colours, and combinations of them, but there are many health and disability causes. That’s the reason why, for each color, there are a number of charities that use it for their publicity and fundraising activities.

Just take the orange ribbon as an example. We know that it is the colour adopted for multiple sclerosis in many countries. Additionally, orange is also used by these causes:

Confusing, isn’t it? Including MS, that’s 14 separate causes to have chosen the orange as the colour of their official ribbon.

Colours started with red

It started more than 25 years ago. The red awareness ribbon for HIV/AIDS was launched by the AIDS Ribbon Project at the 45th Annual Tony Awards ceremony on June 2, 1991.

Yes, the red ribbon was, apparently, the first ever ribbon symbol. And that led to all the rest, including the orange ribbon for MS and the renowned pink one for breast cancer awareness.

Mind you, there s nothing new about wearing coloured symbols. For example, each political party has its own colour. Parties use their colours for promotional material and election rosettes worn by party workers. What’s more, William Shakespeare wrote about coloured symbols that people wore.

In the famous English playwright’s classic Othello (Act iv, scene 3), Desdemona refer to an early version of the song “All round my hat, I wears a green willow”. The lyrics say: “If anyone should ask, the reason why I wears it, tell them that my true love is far, far away”.

Today, we have so many charities, and other causes, all trying to raise money and awareness. And there are too few colours to go round.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Atos tries to escape its past though superficial rebranding

There is a new company providing assessments of people claiming government disability benefits in the UK. Well, no, there isn’t.

You see, the new name, Independent Assessment Services, is just a rebranding exercise.

True, the name is new but it is the same bad old company.  It is still Atos Healthcare but now in disguise. No doubt it hopes to escape its reputation. as Atos has been the subject of numerous allegations.

atosIts assessors have been accused of numerous, serious and harmful failings in the way they have carried out assessments. The most recent example is that one of its assessors left a disabled woman to sit in her own urine for nearly two hours. Now, Atos launched an investigation.

This was after a Disability News Service (DNS) investigation that found many cases where claimants described how assessors from both Atos and the other assessment company Capita, filed dishonest reports of face-to-face assessments.

According to DNS, Gail Ward, from disability activist Black Triangle Campaign, responded to the rebranding by accusing Atos of “trying to create a “smokescreen” to cover up its “incompetence” in carrying out assessments.

She said: “Atos can rebrand all they wish. We will still call them Atos at every opportunity.”

She stated that Atos’s actions had left many disabled people trapped in their own homes, after losing their entitlement to Personal Independence Payment (PIP), with many having to return their Motability vehicles.

Many grassroots campaigners were receiving requests for help in dealing with “fabrication of facts” in Atos PIP assessment reports. This had caused many sick and disabled people “a great deal of distress”.

Her Black Triangle colleague John McArdle added: “Atos has not changed its spots and is still working as the government’s henchman.

“We see the same litany of wrongdoing reported by DNS. Fraudulent reports, and catastrophic harm being caused to disabled people.”

He said the attempt to rebrand itself as a “respectable organisation” would fail6. He added: “Atos is infamous for carrying out systematic abuse of the fundamental human rights of disabled people.

“It is a toxic brand. It is a byword for corporate wrongdoing worldwide.”

Atos defends new name

An Atos spokesman said last week: “We believe the new name better reflects the role the company undertakes on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions and the assessment work the company carries out.

“The change also follows the first independent review by Paul Gray which recommended a number of changes to claimant communications.

“It was planned and implemented in consultation with a number of disability representative organisations. They are supportive and welcome the change.”

However, DNS denied that. It said: “The two disability organisations Atos said supported the name change told DNS that they did no such thing.”

Interesting!

The spokesman added that policies – and assessment procedures – remain unchanged,

Now, that is a shame, because it seems that all the problems stem from those policies and procedures.

Changing the name is not enough. It is superficial. The company needs to change how it does its work, its culture.

People who are responsible for dishonest assessments, whether individual assessors or in management, have no business being there. Heads should roll.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Even a little independence is a great feeling

If you have mobility problems, getting out and about is extremely difficult. And doing so without the constant presence of a helper, assistant, or caregiver is something that is next to impossible.

As multiple sclerosis affects my left side, I cannot propel myself in a manual wheelchair. So, forget any thoughts of independence. It’s just out of the question.

But earlier this week, I managed to visit both the health centre, and a bank, in our nearest town. Alone.

independence

This is my wheelchair.

It was all thanks to my lightweight, foldable electric wheelchair. It is so compact, when folded, that it goes in the back of our car. The only trouble is that, although lightweight, because of my disability, it’s still beyond my ability to lift by myself.

So on Tuesday, after I drove the five miles to town, Lisa lifted the chair out of the car and I was quickly on my way to see the nurse. Encountering just a short delay from my appointment time, I practiced my very basic Spanish language skills, and was soon on the second leg of my journey.

Worry-free independence

It’s a fairly long but straight road from the health centre to the bank, although it is uphill and has several side roads. I negotiated all the dropped kerbs successfully, and it really felt good to be able to do all of it by myself.

In the meantime, Lisa was doing a bit of shopping without having to worry about me.

We met back at our car, as arranged. Lisa was there first and suggested we visit a nearby snack bar for a pastry and orange juice.

Finally, we returned to the car where we jointly lifted the folded chair back into the car, before I drove home.

It wasn’t a great feat, and was nothing to shout about, but doing it by myself made me feel good.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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New welfare boss is either loyal party stooge or genuinely uncaring

David Gauke is the new man in charge of the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) in the UK. He has been appointed by lame duck prime minister Theresa May.

Gauke

David Gauke MP. (Picture: South West Herts Conservatives Association).

So, as the PM works on a deal with the Democratic Unionists, can we expect more compassion from the DWP? Regretfully, the answer is ‘no’.

Look at the way Gauke has voted on welfare and benefits in the House of Commons to see the truth.

Gauke’s voting record

TheyWorkForYou.com says this is how David Gauke voted:

  • Generally, he voted to reduce housing benefit for social tenants deemed to have excess bedrooms. Labour describes this as the “bedroom tax”. 11 votes for, 0 votes against, 6 absences, between 2012 and 2014.
  • He consistently voted against raising welfare benefits at least in line with prices. 0 votes for, 5 votes against, in 2013.
  • Almost always, he voted against paying higher benefits over longer periods for those unable to work due to illness or disability. 0 votes for, 13 votes against, 2 absences, between 2011 and 2016.
  • He consistently voted for making local councils responsible for helping those in financial need afford their council tax and reducing the amount spent on such support. 4 votes for, 0 votes against, in 2012.
  • Almost always, he voted for a reduction in spending on welfare benefits. 45 votes for, 1 vote against, 8 absences, between 2012 and 2016.
  • He consistently voted against spending public money to create guaranteed jobs for young people who have spent a long time unemployed. 0 votes for, 9 votes against, between 2011 and 2014.

Still no care at top?

That means David Gauke is loyal and votes as he is told by his party. Either that, or he is as genuinely uncaring as his Conservative predecessors.

Whichever is true, his appointment seems likely to prove disappointing for all who receive welfare benfits. And that includes everyone who is elderly, has a disability, has a low income, or is without a job.

Source of voting record: TheyWorkForYou.com. For an explanation of the vote descriptions please see the FAQ entries on vote descriptions and how the voting record is decided.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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May’s ‘extreme’ bedfellows may be good for welfare benefits

government

Prime Minister Theresa May.

It is no surprise that Theresa May wants to hold on to the keys of 10 Downing Street. After all, it is the official home of the British prime minister. But she needs help, her Conservative party fell several seats short of an overall majority in last week’s general election.

As I write this, talks are continuing between the Conservatives and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP). The DUP is the only other party that is willing to support a May government. And that could be interesting as far as disability and other benefits are concerned.

So, what is the DUP and what does it stand for?

Right-wing, ‘extremist’

DUP leader Arlene Foster.

It is Northern Ireland’s right-wing, unionist, protestant party. It’s the largest political party in the province and is the fifth largest in the UK’s House of Commons. It is an organisation that was born out of controversy, being founded in 1971 during the worst of the troubles. The founder and first leader was the late firebrand Rev Ian Paisley. Some label it ‘extremist’.

But what does that mean for all of us, wherever we may be?

The DUP is Eurosceptic and an advocate of a hard Brexit. It is a fierce defender of protestant unionism (with Great Britain) against Roman Catholic Irish nationalism (merging with Ireland). It opposes both gay marriage and legalised abortion.

Voted against government’s benefit cuts

Interestingly, however, while the party’s MPs might not always be in the House of Commons chamber, when they were there during the last parliament, they consistently vote against the Conservative’s cuts in welfare benefits.

Any deal between the two parties looks set to be on a case-by-case basis, not a formal coalition. As such, it could mean that the Conservative minority government might be outvoted if it tries to impose any further cuts in this sensitive area.

Now, that would be a step forward for those of us who rely on those benefits because we have a disability, or are elderly.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Cambridge scientist ‘on verge of curing multiple sclerosis’

A researcher from Cambridge University, UK, has made a discovery which could lead to a cure for multiple sclerosis. What’s more, she says it can tackle other diseases too.

LIF

Dr Su Metcalfe of LIFNano (Photo David Johnson).

Dr Su Metcalfe was working at the university’s department of surgery when she made her big breakthrough. “I was looking to see what controls the immune response and stops it auto-attacking us,” she told the Cambridge News.

It all revolves around a stem cell particle called a LIF.

She explained: “I discovered a small binary switch, controlled by a LIF, which regulates inside the immune cell itself. A LIF is able to control the cell to ensure it doesn’t attack your own body but then releases the attack when needed.

“That LIF, in addition to regulating and protecting us against attack, also plays a major role in keeping the brain and spinal cord healthy. In fact, it plays a major role in tissue repair generally. It turns on stem cells that are naturally occurring in the body.”

It is a natural regenerative medicine, and plays a big part in repairing a damaged brain.

Stopping and reversing disease

“So, I thought this is fantastic. We can treat autoimmune disease, and we’ve got something to treat MS, which attacks both the brain and the spinal cord. It’s a double whammy that can stop and reverse the autoimmunity (disease), and also repair the damage caused in the brain.”

There was a problem, though. The LIF only survives outside the cell for 20 minutes before it is broken down. This meant there was not enough time to deploy it in a therapy.

The answer turns out to be nano-particles.

The particles were developed at Yale University, USA. Yale is listed as co-inventor with Su, but LIFNano has the worldwide licence to deploy them.

Su says: “Nano-medicine is a new era, and big pharma has already entered this space to deliver drugs while trying to avoid the side effects. The quantum leap is to actually go into biologics and tap into the natural pathways of the body.

“We’re not using any drugs, we’re simply switching on the body’s own systems of self-tolerance and repair. There aren’t any side effects because all we’re doing is tipping the balance. Auto-immunity (diseases) happen when that balance has gone awry slightly, and we simply reset that. Once you’ve done that, it becomes self-sustaining and you don’t have to keep giving therapy, because the body has its balance back.”

LIF clinical trials

LIFNano has already attracted two major funding awards, from drug firm Merck and government agency Innovate UK. Su has recruited chairman Florian Kemmerich and ceo Oliver Jarry, both with experience in the pharma sector. The company hopes to attract more investment, with the aim of starting clinical trials in 2020.

“The 2020 date is ambitious, but with the funding we’ve got and the funding we’re hoping to raise, it should be possible,” says Su.

What’s in store for LIFNano after MS?

“MS is our key driver at the moment, but it’s going to be leading through to other major auto-immune disease areas,” Su answers

“Psoriasis is high up on our list, and diabetes is another. Downstream there are all the dementias, because a LIF is a major health factor for the brain. So, if we can get it into the brain we can start protecting against dementia.”

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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