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News and Opinions about MS, Health & Disability

‘Funny walk´ is disgusting reason to throw disabled customer out of store

Do you “walk funny”? I sure know that I do, whenever I try. Drop foot causes my left foot to drag and the whole effort is a struggle.

Mobility problems like this are a way of life of people with disabilities, however caused. My difficulties stem from multiple sclerosis but many of you may have Parkinson’s or a yet different disease.

Our walking issues tend to only be seen when we try to carry on as normal, and can be misunderstood. I have been mistaken for being drunk but, each time, a quick explanation that I have MS was enough.

Apparently, however, a similar explanation was not enough in one Halfords store. There, although he told the manager that he had Parkinson’s, she told him to leave. That is disgusting – and a terrible indictment of Halfords’ staff training on disability awareness.

This is how BBC News reported the story online:

Parkinson’s sufferer ejected from Halfords ‘for funny walk’

A man with Parkinson’s disease was told to leave a Halfords store for acting suspiciously by “walking funny”.

Chris Cartlidge, 51, was ejected from the shop in Trent Vale, Stoke-on-Trent, after his symptoms caused his leg to stiffen and drag on the floor.

He said when he told a shop assistant he had Parkinson’s, she replied: “I don’t care what you’ve got, I want you to leave the store.”

Halfords said it had “sincerely apologised” to him and his family.

Mr Cartlidge, who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s 10 years ago, said he had approached the shop assistant for help in finding some car parts in January.

Devastated and mortified

“I try to be as normal as possible but it’s really demeaning when people say things like that to me,” he said.

awareness

Katrina Cartlidge.

His daughter Katrina Cartlidge said she was “devastated and mortified” by the way her father was treated at the store on Springfields Retail Park.

“It’s hard to see him suffering like this,” she said, adding that he tried to “make the most of life” and remain as active as possible.

“I would never expect someone to treat my dad that way or anyone to be judged by that – by disability.”

A spokesperson for Halfords said its team “fell short of meeting our standards”.

“We are all very sorry for Mr Cartlidge’s experience and sincerely apologised to him and his family at the time for any embarrassment this misunderstanding caused.”

Whoa, ‘misunderstanding’? There was no misunderstanding. It was a complete lack of understanding of a person with a disability. Amazingly, even after she was told he had Parkinson’s disease, the store manager didn’t care and ordered him to leave. So, no misunderstanding – more a complete lack of judgment, lack of disability awareness, and lack of customer relations.

Benali Hamdache, campaign manager at Parkinson’s UK, said the charity is “calling for a little bit more awareness and a little bit more understanding”.

“We hope that Halfords can actually start by leading with an example and embrace our call to take on some training,” he added.

I fully support these views, Parkinson’s UK is really speaking for everyone with disabilities, but I must go further. Halfords needs to rigorously push disability awareness, ensure all staff have appropriate training, and monitor everyone’s adherence to it.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is intended for your general knowledge only. It is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor and cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek medical care for any health issues and consult a doctor before starting a diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.

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Is your MS flare-up real or is it a pseudo-relapse?

Have you had a multiple sclerosis relapse recently? Actually, would you know if you had? In fact, would you be aware whether you are had a relapse or a pseudo-relapse?

Pseudo? What’s that? Read on.

A true relapse – or flare-up, exacerbation, even attack – is a time of new or worsening of MS symptoms.

For your episode to be recognized as a true MS relapse, four conditions have to be met. These are:

•       pseudo-relapse Existing symptoms of MS must have become worse or new symptoms appeared.

•        Symptoms must last at least 24 hours.

•        Symptoms must occur at least 30 days after the last relapse.

•        There must be no other explanation for the symptoms.

However, even knowing this list, identifying what you have can be difficult. And it matters not whether you have had MS for years or are newly diagnosed. Telling the difference between a true or pseudo-relapse is more than a little tricky.

Telling the difference

On the upside, pseudo-relapse symptoms tend not to last long. Indeed, they may resolve within a day. Additionally, if your symptoms are caused by something else that can be treated, such treatment will resolve the problem.

Most importantly, pseudo-relapses are not caused by new damage to the central nervous system. A pseudo-relapse is NOT associated with an active MS lesion on MRI.

So, what are likely to cause pseudo-relapses? Well, they may be caused by heat sensitivity or infections including the common cold.

Once you get over these infections, your MS symptoms should get better.

Medications, both for MS and for other conditions, can also cause new symptoms. Be sure to discuss any medications you are taking with your healthcare provider.

True or pseudo-relapse?

Here are some clues to help you decide if your episode is true or not.

Timing: If your worsened symptoms resolve fairly quickly, it is likely that you may have a pseudo-relapse.

Old symptoms: Reappearance of old symptoms is more common in a pseudo-relapse. Generally, you will not experience another true relapse in exactly the same way as a previous one.

Types of symptoms: Some worsened symptoms are more likely to be a pseudo-relapse than a true relapse. These include sudden worsening of spasticity and pain, which are certainly seen in MS, but are rarely due to an acute relapse.

As someone with secondary progressive MS, and who has inactive lesions, I don’t get true relapses. Pseudo-relapses are, though, a way of life – especially if I have an infection.

I have been sneezing a lot in the past few days and am starting to get that ´blocked up´ feeling – sure signs that a cold is on the way.  Oh joy, my MS symptoms are set to get worse temporarily – my very own pseudo-relapse.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor and cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult a doctor before starting a new diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.

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MS: In sickness and in health, until …

I just love the image on an MS sweatshirt that popped up on Facebook the other day.

The central graphic is the orange MS ribbon flanked by a pair of angel wings. Above it are the words:

Someone said to me “I don’t know how you do it”

Below, it says:

I replied “I wasn’t given a choice”

loved onesThe graphic had such an impression on me that I was considering buying one for my beloved wife Lisa. But then, the message wouldn’t match reality as she DID have a choice.

Unlike most people whose loved ones have MS, or any other chronic illness, Lisa was fully aware that I had the disease well before we were married. In fact, well before I proposed.

The majority of spouses only learn of their loved ones’ diagnosis when they themselves do. Many stay to give care alongside love but some end up leaving as the strain becomes too much.

This was brought home to me by a piece published online by multiplesclerosis.net, written by Devin Garlit.

This is the beginning of his article:

So I’m sitting here, just flabbergasted that it’s happened again. For the third time in just this month, a fellow MS Warrior has confided in me that their significant other is leaving them because of their disease.

This is not a new occurrence, I’ve had many people reach out to me with similar stories, particularly after I wrote about my own experience with the subject

Loved ones

Many platforms are quick to share stories of wonderful relationships that endure despite MS, but it’s clear that many times, things go a different way. In fact, every breakup that I’ve heard about was often a “solid” relationship until it wasn’t. 

Being the partner of someone with MS, especially as the disease progresses, isn’t for everyone. A chronic illness is the ultimate test of a relationship, a test that not all will pass. I’m here to remind you that it’s ok when this happens, that you aren’t alone, and that life is far from over if that test fails. 

When it comes to marriage, people are quick to point out vows, and how they often explicitly mention this scenario. It’s right there right? “In sickness and in health” A vow is forever, right? Well, yes, that’s the idea. But in practice, it doesn’t always work out that way.

Let’s face it, a lot of people break vows. I’m not saying that’s ok, I’m just pointing out the reality. No matter how much you believe in vows, you can’t always be prepared for what it takes to be with someone with a chronic illness.

When you take those vows, your intentions may be great, but you simply can’t understand what life might be like. How many people have been tough guys during training but have gone to war and were suddenly not-so-tough once the bullets started flying? I’m guessing many.

 What would you do?

It’s always easy to point to vows and say, “but hey, they promised”. The truth is, none of us can say what we’d do in that situation. Many of you are saying, “oh, I’d stay by them, I’d stick to my vow”. 

Well, yea, I say that too, but, I also know that, until I’m in that situation, I can’t really be sure what I would do.

You can read Devin’s complete article here.

I applaud all spouses, partners or ´significant others’ for staying with their loved ones in their time of need. Likewise, I sympathise with those who cannot see that journey through.

My beloved Lisa.

In my case, Lisa is amazing and loving. She loves me as I love her. She gives me 24/7 care but says she does what she does for me as my wife, not my carer.

Add to that, my sweet angel not only knew I had MS but also had prior knowledge of it. Her grandfather also had the disease, and she knew how it might progress. So, that sweatshirt wouldn’t be right for Lisa. She DID have a choice. Her eyes were wide open, and she still agreed.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor and cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult a doctor before starting a new diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.

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Just how are you coping with your health?

“Hi, how are you?” is, perhaps, today’s less formal equivalent of the traditional and polite greeting “How do you do?”

Of course, the greeting is only a rhetorical question and usually we say some form of “I’m fine, thanks.” Sometimes, we say it even when we could feel better.

When you have a serous illness, such as multiple sclerosis, you are sometimes asked a real question about your health, how the disease is affecting you, and so on. And that got me thinking, how am I getting on, how am I coping with MS? And, how are you doing?

how are youMS is certainly not new to me as my first symptoms appeared more than 40 years ago, although it was not definitely diagnosed until 2002. But, just how am I doing?

Regular readers will undoubtedly recall that I visited the HSCT facility in Moscow in October 2016, where it was discovered that I had a vitamin D deficiency. As a result of that, I began to take a daily supplement.

Then, at the end of October last year, I was seen by a neurologist here in Spain – having not seen one during my last 10 years living in the UK. Tests here showed by vitamin D deficiency had improved slightly but its level was still far too low. Additionally, they indicated a similar lack of vitamin B.

So, me medications have now been adjusted to increase significantly the amount of vitamin D supplement and to introduce a regular dose of vitamin B.

How are you? Better, worse, or the same

Have they had an impact? Well, it may be too early to tell. Any perceived gain could only be wishful thinking, but let me tell you what’s been happening.

I don’t usually use my wheelchair at home but Lisa has been unwell, so I have had to do more around the house. To enable me to do this, and to avoid the risk of falling, my neat folding motorized wheelchair has been pressed into use indoors.

On Friday, I drove into our nearest town to visit our bank and the supermarket. When I returned to my car, my wheelchair suffered a mechanical malfunction that turned out to be extremely minor and was fixed by a neighbour in less than five minutes when I got home.

Having left my chair with my neighbor, I had to get from my car into the house by myself. To most people, this would not cause a problem but to me, it was equivalent to a major trek.

I walked carefully up a ramp while holding onto a handrail, entered the house and made it to my armchair without any incident. I was not out of breath, and felt good.

It was a minor achievement that made me feel good, but was it the result of vitamin supplements or just one of my good days? Obviously, I cannot tell yet. But any improvement, no matter how small, must be seen as a sign of encouragement.

What about you, how are you getting on?

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor and cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult a doctor before starting a new diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.

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Be positive about living life your way

life

If you are living with a disability, or a chronic illness like multiple sclerosis, how do you choose to approach life?

Some people will say “You must” or “You must not” do this, that, or the other. But, in my opinion, they are wrong. I will only urge you to do certain things, no more. No, ‘you must’ or ‘you should’. Not from me.

We are all individuals and need to form our own opinions and make our own decisions. The human race is not an actual race, not a contest. We are each unique and do not benefit from comparison to other people.

Therefore, what follows is not a list of rules to follow. They are just things that I do, that I would urge you to consider. 

Focus on what you can do – and do it. I put what I can no longer do where it belongs. By that, I mean as a happy memory from my past.

Keep calm. By that I mean, when faced with a problem or difficulty, I think about how to overcome it. It’s important not to panic, I take my time and think my way through it.

Don’t worry too much about the future. Sure, if there is anything that can be done to make life better, then by all means I’ll do it. However, in the words of an old song, “Whatever will be, will be, The future’s not ours to see”, so there is little point worrying about it. Perhaps it would be better to consider what we do with our lives now, rather than what might, or might not, happen in years to come.

Grasp opportunities in life

Live life to the full. I grasp every opportunity that presents itself. In the past six years, I have divorced and remarried; gone to the most northern point of mainland Europe; visited Hawaii, New York, and Moscow; crossed the Atlantic by cruise ship; and moved to live in Spain. There’s an adage in the business world that is perfect for us. And that is not to see problems as insurmountable obstacles but as opportunities to be taken. In other words, turn a negative into a positive.

Live your life as you want to live. While I urge you to live positively, ultimately how you live your life is your own decision.

Accept the love of those nearest and dearest to you, and make sure you show your love for them in return. Think about it for a moment, where would we be without their support?

No man is an island, so the saying goes, and that is true. Whether or not you have a disability, isolation is not an easy choice. While I prize my independence, as I am sure you do, sometimes I do need help. You will too. At such times, we don’t need to be too independent or proud to accept assistance – or even ask for it.

Value yourself. Please don’t fall into the trap of believing that your disability makes you worthless. You do have value as an individual with your own opinions, as a member of your community

Live your life, speak your truth. While speaking out will come easer to some than others, it is important that we speak for ourselves. We need to be our own advocates; no one else can do it as well as ourselves.

Happy New Year.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor and cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult a doctor before starting a new diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.

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New Year resolutions: Do we want or need them?

New Year resolutions may have their place in some people’s lives but not in mine. That’s not to say that I never set targets, and set out to achieve them, but I cannot see anything special about January 1.

Yes, it marks the start of a new calendar year – but, so what?

resolutions If you want to start, or stop, doing something in your life, then you should start doing so immediately. For example, give up smoking on March 23 or start a new diet on August 4. There is nothing magical about the beginning of January.

And, if truth be known, most New Year resolutions don’t last very long. Determination of most people, even those with the very best intentions, tends to wane fast and their resolutions quickly fall by the wayside. Mostly, this happens in months, if not weeks, or even days.

I am completely sure that I’d be one of those who give up and ditch their resolutions sooner than later. And this is fine for anybody who wants to do something, but not for someone who needs to do it.

‘Want’ vs ‘need’

There is a great deal of difference between ‘want’ and ‘need’. As an example, you might ‘want’ to eat a large meal, but it isn’t a ‘need’. However, you do ‘need’ to eat to live. To put it simply, a ‘want’ is something you would like to have, but is not absolutely necessary. While a good thing to have, it is not essential. A ‘need’ is essential.

As someone with a chronic disease, in my case multiple sclerosis, the need to look after myself is extremely important. It could even be described as critical.

It includes keeping a careful watch on what I eat along with the amount and level of exercise I take. Also, through my doctor, I have to keep an eye on my vitamin levels, particularly B and D. I was found to be vitamin D deficient in 2016, and a couple of months ago my vitamin B level was discovered to be too low. I have now been prescribed supplements of both.

To live as healthy a life as possible is an ongoing need. It is not related to the New Year and will not be put aside like a resolution.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor and cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult a doctor before starting a new diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.

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Determined to continue MS fight in retirement

Today, November 8 2017, I celebrate my 65th birthday, and have reached my retirement age. That is the age at which I can claim the national pension.

For many years the retirement age in the UK has been 65 for men and 60 for women, but that’s all changing. Indeed, if I had been born just 11 months later, my retirement aged would have been 66. And the later your date of birth, the later retirement age will be. The plan is that it will eventually rise to 68 for everyone.

retirement

That’s me. A few months old in 1953.

So, what does it mean for me?

Well, I have finally reached an age that always seemed so far away in the most distant future. But as the wheel of life continues to turn relentlessly through the seasons, the years pass … seemingly faster and faster.

When, I received a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis 15½ years ago, I was 49. Even then, 65 seemed so very far away, but here I am.

Will I be putting my feet up and be taking life more slowly? Not a chance, except when fatigue creeps up on me.  My mobility may be seriously affected by having MS, but my electric wheelchair lets me get out and about and ensures my independence (special thanks here to Shaun Atkinson and his Better Products for Disabled People company).

Retirement, the MS fight goes on

My family is the greatest thing in my life. My beloved wife Lisa (who is my lover, my carer, and my rock) and two cats make up our household here in southern Spain where we enjoy the good life of 300 days of sunshine a year.

retirement

That’s me, again. Approaching my 30th birthday in 1982.

I haven’t been able to go out to work for 10 years now, because of MS, so reaching retirement age means little to me. Certainly, no retirement party or parting gift. I will continue, though, to write this blog as well as occasional articles about healthcare.

I am determined to enjoy my retirement years, notwithstanding this terrible disease. After all, I am still me. Age is just a number, nothing more, nothing less.

MS doesn’t define me. Neither does disability, nor age; I define myself.

I may be disabled. I may be retired, a pensioner, a senior citizen. But most of all, I am me, a person. And, as far as MS is concerned, I am a fighter, a warrior, and tireless advocate.

MS will never get me, I’ll never give up. Nor should you. Whether you have MS, another disease, or have a disability from a different cause. Stand strong.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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MS Society calls for legalisation of medicinal cannabis and dispels 5 myths

Legalise medicinal cannabis is the call of the MS Society as it tries to persuade the UK government to act. And, as part of its campaign, the society is seeking to dispel some popular misconceptions. It has also produced its own report on the use of medicinal cannabis in treating MS.1

Oomsn its website, the society says that with so much information “swirling around the internet”, it’s hard to be sure what’s true and what’s not. That’s why it decided, in its own words, “to bust five common myths about cannabis and MS”.

These are the misconceptions that the society has highlighted:

1. ‘Cannabis for medicinal use’ means any kind of cannabis

This can be confusing, as the media often refers to both licensed cannabis products and the illegal drug as ‘medicinal cannabis’.

What medical professionals usually mean by ‘medicinal cannabis’ or ‘medical cannabis’ is cannabis products licensed as medical treatments. So, for MS, that means Sativex, which is specifically licensed to treat muscle spasms and stiffness in MS. Journalists or other people using the phrase could mean cannabis used for any medical purpose.

We’re calling for the Government to legalise cannabis for two medicinal purposes: to treat pain and spasticity when other treatments haven’t worked.

2. Cannabis has never been legal for medicinal use

This isn’t true. Thanks to the evidence, countries including Germany and Canada have already made cannabis available for medicinal use, and Ireland is considering it.2 This means people in those countries can get it safely on prescription and be confident about the quality and doses of what they’re taking.

We want the UK Government to do the same, so people with MS can treat their symptoms safely.

3. Smoking cannabis is as safe as taking Sativex

medicinalWrong – evidence shows that smoking cannabis can be harmful to people with MS, especially when it’s mixed with tobacco. Unfortunately, smoking has also been shown to speed up how quickly people develop secondary progressive MS.

As cannabis is illegal there’s no guidance about doses or quality either, so you can’t be sure if what you’re smoking is safe.

4. Cannabis is natural, so it’s better than pharma drugs

That’s not how it works. One of the main active ingredients in cannabis is THC (tetrahydrocannabinol). THC is ‘psychoactive’ and can do lots of things – including alter your mind and make you hallucinate. If you or your family have a history of mental health problems (such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder), using cannabis can trigger these or make them worse.

5. Cannabidiol (CBD) products will help my MS

CBD is the other active ingredient in cannabis. It’s not psychoactive like THC and has anti-inflammatory, anti-tremor and anti-spasmodic properties.

At the moment, there’s not enough evidence to show that products containing just CBD, like cannabis oils, can help MS symptoms. And currently there are no CBD products licensed to treat MS symptoms.

But the evidence shows that cannabis containing both CBD and THC could work for some people with MS to help with pain and spasms. It is thought that the ratio of THC to CBD determines the level of psychoactive vs. therapeutic effects of cannabis.

That’s why we think the UK Government should change the law to make cannabis available for medicinal use to help people with MS treat pain and muscle spasms, where other treatments have not worked for them.

I have never tried cannabis in any form, so cannot give any recommendation one way or another. However, I have looked into the issue and can say that I’d be prepared to give medicinal cannabis a try.

1 Cannabis and MS – The role of cannabis in treating MS symptoms.

2 The use of cannabis has been legalised in more countries than the society says, as well as some US states.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Bill to legalise medicinal cannabis clears first hurdle, but will it go further?

Campaigners for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis are this week celebrating a small victory. Legalisation could help people with multiple sclerosis and other diseases but, realistically, there’s little chance it will become law

cannabis

Paul Flynn MP.

Paul Flynn, Labour MP for Newport West and patron of the United Patients Alliance (UPA) presented a 10-Minute Rule Motion in the UK parliament’s House of Commons. Its purpose is to legalise the use of cannabis as a medicine.

UPA supporters, who gathered outside, took delighted when the bill gained its first reading. This is the first step on a long journey of any bill to pass into law.

The UPA aims to make sure everyone who might benefit from cannabis, to improve their quality of life, have access to it without the risk of criminalisation or stigmatisation.

Its website says: “We would see a legal, regulated supply of cannabis for patients so that they can use it safely, with knowledge of strain and dosage and with the best knowledge on healthy modes of intake and ways of medicating with cannabis.”uld see a legal, regulated supply of cannabis for patients so that they can use it safely, with knowledge of strain and dosage and with the best knowledge on healthy modes of intake and ways of medicating with cannabis.

In pursuit of this, the UPA organised a peaceful demonstration outside parliament, in the form of a ‘cannabis tea party’. It highlighted how the drug acts as pain relief for those with chronic and fatal illnesses.

The UK currently bans the use of cannabis for medical purposes. Sativex spray is the only exception.

Across the world, medicinal cannabis, or marijuana, is legal in many places including Canada and Uruguay. It is also legal in a number of states in America as it in some European countries.

Legalising cannabis – intelligent and compassionate

Flynn joined the tea party, and said: “We have to say to the government, for goodness sake, catch up with the rest of the world and allow a responsible legal market to operate to replace a market that’s illegal and dangerous.

cannabis“It’s political cowardice, they’re afraid of being mocked on this, but I’m afraid politicians don’t get credit for acting intelligently. This is the intelligent and compassionate thing to do. The law is an ass.”

Flynn has named his proposal The Elizabeth Brice Bill, named after a multiple sclerosis patient who died in 2011. She has been a long-time campaigner for legalising cannabis for medical purposes and started the UK branch of the Alliance for Cannabis Therapeutics. She and Flynn are said to have drunk cannabis tea together, in parliament, many years ago.

The next stage of the lawmaking process is the Second Reading. This has been set for Friday, February 23.

Bills introduced by MPs under the Ten-Minute Rule don’t often progress much further. Most stimulate publicity for, or seek the house’s opinion about, an issue which may later feature in another bill.

However, not all Ten-Minute Rule bills fail. Some do become law. Indeed, since 1945, more than 60 of them have become Acts of Parliament.

Perhaps, one day, UK drug laws may change but don’t expect Paul Flynn’s bill to achieve that. Sadly, there are too many MPs prepared to oppose it.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

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Beach accessibility is OK, but what about the sea?

I live 15 minutes from the beach, where the sun shines around the year, and accessibility for wheelchairs is provided. That’s good news for people with disabilities, like me with multiple sclerosis, and other wheelchair users.

beach

That’s me on the beach wheelchair access in Spain. That’s as close as I can get to the Mediterranean behind me.

The majority of Spanish beaches facing the Mediterranean have permanent wooden pathways across the sand. And they culminate in a cross-piece parallel to, but yards from, the water’s high tide level. This seems like most beaches that provide access for chairs without the special wide tyres that can handle sand.

I was reading about a campaign in the USA to make sure beaches there become accessible. The article was written by a former colleague of mine, Ed Tobias, and published by Multiple Sclerosis News Today. In his MS Wire column, Ed wrote:

Beach Days for All

So, I want to applaud some people who live along the New Jersey shore and who launched a campaign called “Beach Days for All.” One of them is Jessica Krill. Jessica was born and raised in Seaside Park, New Jersey. She knows about beach access problems because she’s the mother of two special-needs children.

beachJessica and her friend, Chris Aldrich, put together a Facebook page promoting their access campaign. They also reached out to Seaside Park’s government officials, spoke before the Borough Council, and enlisted the support of Justin Auciello, the creator of the website and Facebook page “Jersey Shore Hurricane News,” to help find a way to make their beach more accessible.

That “way” turned out to be using temporary, hard plastic mats, similar to those that cover the grass and dirt at sports stadiums during special events, such as concerts. The mats formed a path from the dunes to the water and they came as a donation from Matrax, the company that supplies mats to Met Life Stadium in New Jersey. Its chief operating officer, Joe Wright, made the offer after seeing the “Beach Days for All” Facebook page. They were put down on Seaside Park’s F Street beach in mid-August.

Wheelchairs have access to beach but not to the water

But those pathways are only good for access to the beach. They fall woefully short, quite literally, of satisfying anyone wanting to dip their feet in the water. And that’s a problem on both sides of the Atlantic. US beach paths appear from the pictures to be of a similar design as here in Spain.

And that should change. It really is time for accessibility for wheelchair users to thought of in terms of the sea itself, not just the beach.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Clinical Writer with Healthline, the fastest growing health information site. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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