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News and Opinions about MS, Health & Disability

Sunscreen compounds help suppress MS symptoms

Vitamin D, whether gained naturally with the help of sunshine or from a supplement, is widely seen as being beneficial if you have MS. Certainly, I have experienced a benefit from taking tablets on a daily basis.

Now, though, scientists are saying that sunscreen, that helps block the sun’s rays, can help suppress symptoms of the disease. At least, two ingredients of the sunscreen do the suppressing – and it was proved to work in mice.

sunscreen

Dr Hector DeLuca,, research team leader.

The ingredients are salate derivatives, which are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

University of Wisconsin, Madison, researchers’ study was published their study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It was titled “Salate derivatives found in sunscreens block experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.”

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Silly season lacks real news stories – whether general or about disabilities

It’s silly season right now. At least, it is in the UK and many other countries. In the US, it is called the slow news season. Elsewhere it can be called cucumber time, or another such term.

The reason, of course, is that at this time of year news is harder to come by. Yes, there are still things going on but in the northern hemisphere parliaments and congresses have long summer breaks. So do courts. South of the equator, the season tends to refer to a period surrounding the Christmas and New Year holidays. Remember, December and January are summer months there.

silly seasonSilly season is a term with which I am quite familiar, having spent my career in journalism. I know full well about the scarcity of real news during the summer.

And that’s why we see frivolous news items in the Press that would not be likely otherwise. Frivolous items that give rise to the term ‘silly season’.

It’s true, too, for news about disabilities. Whatever, and however, a disability affects us – developments are scarce during these months. Changes to benefits? Sorry, no, the government is on holiday.

The independent organization Benefits and Work publishes a regular newsletter, but not during the silly season. In its last edition on July 17, it said: “This is our last newsletter, and money-off coupon, until Friday September 6. Parliament is about to go into recess and will return on September 5, briefly, before the conference season begins.

Silly season = slow news

“That should mean that we are spared any more new initiatives or bogus consultations before the Autumn and gives us all a chance to recharge our batteries. But, if anything dramatic does occur relating to benefits, we’ll bring out a special edition.”

In the UK, parliament has not met since July 20 and returns on September 5. In the US, congress finished one week later, on July 28, but also restarts on September 5.

Any news about developments in new drugs and treatment of diseases such as multiple sclerosis? No, not at all. The last news update on the website of the MS Society was posted on June 30. In the USA, the National MS Society last posted a news item on August 8 – and that wasn’t about MS. It was about the congress summer holiday.

And don’t expect to take your benefits claim to court either. The UK High Court’s summer break lasts from August 1 to the beginning of October.

Oh well, it looks as though the news media will, once again, have to resort to the frivolous.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Healthline, the fastest growing health information site. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

 

 

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Blood test can shorten MS diagnosis to 7 days

IQuity has launched1 an RNA-based2 blood test that, it says, can confirm a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis in seven days.

This is much faster than using conventional diagnostic methods. These usually involve a series of visits to clinics, various tests and can many months to complete. Sometimes even longer.

The new test is called IsolateMS and is 90% accurate.

People have long been concerned about the time conventional diagnosis takes. This faster method, with results in just seven days, will allow doctors to start treatment of MS patients earlier than before. Earlier treatment can help slow the illness and allow better

isolatems

IQuity CEO Dr Chase Spurlock.

IQuity chief executive officer Dr Chase Spurlock said: “The 90% accuracy rate of IsolateMS should give providers and patients a great deal of confidence in their results.

IsolateMS elimates period of uncertainty

“This test augments existing clinical practice and eliminates the period of uncertainty that can accompany an MS diagnosis. IsolateMS allows patients and providers to begin discussing next steps immediately.”

When I think back to the time doctors diagnosed MS in me, I remember it was quite fast. Well, fast in conventional terms – only three months. But, wow, seven days would have been great. And I would definitely have swapped that process for a simple blood test.

Added to that, the diagnosis might have been made years earlier when symptoms, later said to be MS, went unrecognized.

 The company has not confirmed its plans to launch IsolateMS outside the US.

1 IsolateMS has been launched in the USA but, initially, is not available in six states. These are: California, Florida, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and New York. IQuity will update this list as these licenses are obtained. 

2 Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a polymeric molecule essential in various biological roles in coding, decoding, regulation, and expression of genes. RNA and DNA are nucleic acids, and, along with lipids, proteins and carbohydrates, constitute the four major macromolecules essential for all known forms of life.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Healthline, the fastest growing health information site. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Disabled employees: What does Brexit mean?

As representatives of the UK and the European Union (EU) negotiate about Brexit, our attention is focused on disability. Now, the spotlight is on how disabled employees may be affected by the country’s withdrawal from the EU.

The Business Disability Forum says that disabled employees, including people with MS, potentially have a lot to lose.

Disabled employees

Diane Lightfoot, Business Disability Forum chief executive.

The forum is a not-for-profit member organisation, headed by chief executive Diane Lightfoot. It aims to makes it easier and more rewarding to do business with, and employ, disabled people.

It warns: “The legislative impact of Brexit – and what it means for disabled employees and customers – is an area of concern. There is real worry that recent progress in the EU around access and equal treatment may be lost, or that standards of accessibility may slip.

“But fair treatment of disabled people has always been about more than just legal compliance. From a business point of view, to harness the full potential of disabled workers, to reduce staff turnover and absence, and to access the £212bn purple pound means going beyond minimum legal standards.

Disabled employees overseas

“It means we need to achieve the best outcomes for all people, with or without disabilities. It goes to the core of being businesses that people will wish to support or want to keep working for.”

Additionally, the forum believes that focusing on good practice rather than legal compliance will only become more important if the UK wishes to be a country that looks outward, and does business on the international stage.

“The work we do overseas focuses not on legal compliance but a universal code of practice for doing business with disabled people,” it says.

“Universal values apply to everyone. Principles for treating disabled people fairly, and working with them, are similar to good customer service, good management and good design.

“Even more importantly, working this way means being disability-smart isn’t effort, but attitude – something ingrained in what we do.

“Brexit may generate uncertainty around legislation and legal risks, but this needn’t bear on organisations doing business with disabled people. In the end, being disability-smart is just about aiming for the best outcome for everyone,” the forum says.

ABOUT THE BUSINESS DISABILITY FORUM

The Business Disability Forum says it builds disability-smart organisations to improve business performance by increasing confidence, accessibility, productivity and profitability.

It does this by bringing together business people, disabled opinion leaders and government to understand what needs to change. Disabled people must be treated fairly so they can contribute to business success, to society and to economic growth.

It has more than 20 years’ experience working with public and private sector organisations, formerly as Employers’ Forum on Disability. Members employ almost 20% of the UK workforce and seek to remove barriers between organisations and disabled people. It is a key stakeholder for both business and government, and has contributed to development of meaningful disability discrimination legislation.

Business Disability Forum provides pragmatic support by sharing expertise, giving advice, providing training and facilitating networking opportunities. This helps organisations become fully accessible to disabled customers and employees.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Benefits for disabled people are in chaos, government admits delays

Introductions of two flagship benefits that affect people with disabilities are both behind schedule. The government department responsible has confirmed that the nationwide roll out is going slower than anticipated.

benefits

Photo: The Independent.

The UK government’s Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has confirmed that Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is far behind schedule. This is the benefit brought in to replace the Disability Living Allowance (DLA), which the government thought unfit for purpose.

And the much-vaunted Universal Credit (UC) has just 540,000 recipients, that is 90% behind schedule. UC was designed to replace six other benefits. These are: income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA), Housing Benefit, Working Tax Credit, Child Tax Credit, income-related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), and Income Support.

As far as PIP is concerned, all existing DLA claimants should have received ‘invitations’ to claim PIP by April of this year. Well, that didn’t happen, that target is now history. Now, the aim is that all working age DLA claimants will have received their invitation letters by late 2018. And final assessments and transfers are now expected to be completed around mid-2019.

Benefits massively behind schedule

According to Benefits and Work website, there has been a huge fall in the number of DLA to PIP cases being sent to DWP’s assessment companies Atos and Capita since January of this year. So, maybe the DWP will not be able to keep to that new target either.

Roll out of UC is massively behind schedule.  It is unlikely to be completed before 2022.

Call me a cynic, if you like, but I believe that target is wildly optimistic. Most UC claimants so far have made the simplest claims, what’s going to happen when they make complex ones? Can the DWP cope?

Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) published a report, last month, and urged the government to pause the roll out of UC. This was because of major problems it is causing even the most straightforward claimants, including 57% having to borrow money while waiting for their first payment.

The DWP, however, has dismissed the concerns of the CAB and has confirmed that the roll out of full service UC will increase from 5 areas a month to 50 areas a month from October.

Whether that will happen, though, is matter for conjecture. I have my doubts.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Zinbryta use restricted in Europe after a death and four serious liver injuries

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has restricted the use of multiple sclerosis drug Zinbryta. The agency took action after a patient died from liver injury (fulminant liver failure). The patient was in an ongoing observational study. Four cases of serious liver injury have also been reported.

We are all likely to experience some side effect of any medication we take, whether for multiple sclerosis or some other disease. Most of us, hopefully, will only have minor problems, if any, but some will be badly affected.

All medicine manufacturers provide a list of their drugs’ side effects, from major to minor, from common to rare. Pharmaceutical companies provide this information for the benefit of patients, not just healthcare professionals.

And, we need to take those lists seriously. After all, it is our health that is on the line.

I always pay close attention to news of new drugs approved for use in the treatment of MS. But, no matter how good the claimed benefits appear, I focus on the possible side effects admitted by the manufacturer.

Now, that is not to say that all disease modifying therapies (DMTs) are bad for us. But we need to balance benefits against the disadvantaged of possible side effects. Everyone must make their own decision.

Such decisions are personal. I have never accepted any DMT.

Zinbryta – liver damage risk known when approved

zinbrytaZinbryta (daclizumab) is one such DMT and its side effects include the risk of liver damage. The EU knew this when it approved the drug in July 2016. In fact, it put several measures in place to manage this risk. These included the requirement to monitor liver function and provide educational materials to healthcare professionals and patients on the risk of liver damage.

Now, though, a year later, the EMA has provisionally restricted the use of the medicine to:

  • patients with highly active relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) that has failed to respond to certain other treatment, and 
  • patients with rapidly evolving relapsing MS who cannot be treated with other medicines.

In addition, doctors must not give the medicine must to patients with liver injury.

It is not recommended for patients with autoimmune conditions other than MS. Medical professionals should be cautious when the give Zinbryta together with medicines that can damage the liver. Doctors are advised to monitor the liver function of patients to whom they give the medicine. They should closely watch patients for signs and symptoms of liver injury.

The EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) has issued these provisional recommendations as a precaution and to ensure that Zinbryta continues to be used as safely as possible while a review of its liver safety is ongoing.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

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Missing Pieces: Missing too much to be meaningful

missing pieces

While I hate to decry any research connected to multiple sclerosis, I feel that this is one of those times. I cannot stay quiet.

A new report says 25% people with MS in the UK don’t know about treatments that may help delay disability. And that’s despite most of them saying disability is their big concern.

But, although the report talks about massive percentages backing up supposed `facts’, those figures gloss over a big problem. The size of the research sample is pathetic.

The MS Society estimates there are 107,000 people with MS in the UK, but the sample size was just 100. Absolutely ridiculous. Additionally, the researchers also surveyed 120 neurologists.

According to CheckMarket, a leading cloud-based survey software solution with more than 10,000 users in 150 countries, the sample size needed to be nearly 2,350.

Apparently, the report was funded by Sanofi Genzyme and conducted by Adelphi Research UK. It is titled The Missing Pieces though, as far as I can see, the main thing missing was a big enough sample.

Only 100 people gave their views, so any percentage given cannot be scaled up to purportedly represent the views of 107,000 people.

It is a great shame really, as the research results would be worth considering if the sample was large enough and was truly representative. But it was neither. Also, online questionnaires are not the best way to obtain a representative sample.

‘Missing Pieces’ misses target

The organizers claim that The Missing Pieces campaign aims to explore attitudes and behaviors around MS treatment in the UK, and to identify gaps in knowledge, understanding, conversations, and treatment/care plans.

Sad to say, because they didn’t plan well enough, their efforts have failed to reach that aim in any meaningful way.

Bearing in mind my warning that the views of 100 people are unlikely to be meaningful, here are its major findings:

  • Around three-quarters of healthcare practitioner think MS patients face delays in beginning DMTs. They blame poor access to neurologists with MS specialities. This is despite the fact that disability prevention is a key goal of the country’s National Health Service. An MS neurologist is needed to start a patient on such treatment
  • 45% of patients said their primary healthcare specialist was an MS nurse. And 20% reported turning most to general practitioners
  • Among all patients surveyed, 36% said they had not seen a neurologist in the past 12 months
  • 50% of patients said they discussed disability with a doctor or nurse at the time of diagnosis. Yet only 34% reported having continuous conversations on disability during subsequent visits
  • 69% of healthcare practitioners reported “routinely discussing” disability with patients around the time of diagnosis
  • Among patients, only 22% reported discussing treatment goals with a healthcare practitioner
  • 45% of patients said they were “scared” they would be disabled

Sanofi Genzyme is the specialty care unit of Sanofi. It markets Lemtrada (alemtuzumab), and Aubagio (teriflunomide), both for use by people with relapsing-remitting MS.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Disability benefit cuts are still a real risk

This week is the first of the six-week summer recess of the UK parliament, which is a great time to look at welfare benefits for people with disabilities.

Regretfully, despite more than a year passing and a new government, albeit the same party, nothing has really changed.

In April last year, I reported that the then secretary for work and pensions Stephen Crabb was about to make a statement about government plans and cuts to welfare benefits. That was after he had said that it had decided not to proceed with planned cuts. They were unpopular with the disability community and controversial within the Conservative party.

benefits

Stephen Crabb.

A month earlier, I wrote an article headed ‘No further plans’ does NOT mean ‘no further cuts’ after Crabb spoke in the House of Commons.

He said that the government “will not be going ahead” with changes to the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) that were announced. He also said there are no further plans for welfare cuts this parliament. (Bold italics are mine).

Their words don’t always mean what you think

I warned that it did not mean PIP was safe – just that the cuts would not be going ahead in the form previously announced. And the part about ‘this parliament’, meant to take us to 2020, is now irrelevant as we have sinve had an early election and have a new parliament.

Then, on May 14, I wrote another post. It was headed ‘No further plans to cut benefits’ pledge lasts 51 days and told of new plans.

Prime minister Theresa May.

About the same time, prime minister Theresa May refused to rule out making further cuts to disability benefits. This wvas widely reported by British daily newspapers.

In March, I wrote about the meaning of the words we heard. In an article headed Don’t be fooled by government’s callous weasel words – disability benefits cuts are still planned, I reported the words of Stephen Crabb as: “We’re not going to be going ahead with these cuts to disability benefits that were proposed on budget day.

“The prime minister has confirmed that himself. I was very clear when I discussed the offer of the job this morning we were not going to go ahead with the cuts that were proposed.”

Cuts to benefits – and weasel words

I also added my own comments:

Sounds good, right? Well, err, no. The key words in the first sentence are ‘that were proposed on budget day’. Similarly, two sentences later the telling words are ‘that were proposed’.

Now, call me a cynic if you like but I have worked as a journalist, spent time in public relations and been around politicians long enough to recognise this for what it is – the use of prepared phrases, or callous weasel words, designed to trick us into thinking the cuts won’t happen.

The government is just trying to buy time to find a way to get them through in another form and without rebellion from within their own MPs.

David Gauke MP. (Picture: South West Herts Conservatives Association).

Trust me, despite what we are being led to believe, the cuts are still very much on the table

What has happened since then? Plenty, but absolutely nothing to prove me wrong or make me change my mind.

As for the current secretary of state for work and pensions, David Gauke, little has been heard, except a change to the timing of a planned increase in the retirement age.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Speaking out to raise awareness may not be easy but it’s vital

I write and speak openly about the fact that I live with a disability, and have multiple sclerosis. It is not difficult for me. I do it to raise awareness of the disease and to help others.

People often find it hard to speak about having a so-called ‘invisible’ disease but, to me, MS is no longer invisible. My mobility is severely affected and is clear for all to see.

Those whose sicknesses are still hidden but choose to talk about them are the true heroes. They are the brave ones.

speaking

Referee Nigel Owens (Pic: Welsh Rugby Union).

For example, let’s look at rugby union top referee Nigel Owens.

So far, and nothing to do with any illness, he was the first rugby union player or official to ‘come out’ as being gay. However, there is more. He admits that when 26 he tried to commit suicide.

In the past, he has also spoken about his successful struggle to overcome eating disorder bulimia nervosa. But now the man who refereed the 2015 rugby world cup final has revealed that bulimia has returned. Bulimia is a disorder of overeating followed by fasting or self-induced vomiting or purging.

Owens told BBC News: “For those who are caught up in eating disorders and say there’s nothing they can do about it, I understand. It takes you over and you feel there is nothing you can do.

“But I would urge anyone suffering to do something. Seek professional advice, tell people about it, don’t hide it, don’t lie about it, that’s a great first step.

Speaking openly

“I came back from refereeing the England summer tour in Argentina a few weeks ago. While I was out there, I made myself sick three to four times. I think because I was eating more food than I needed.”

“I’m speaking openly about it because I know that men and boys can view it as a sign of weakness by admitting there’s a problem that you can’t sort out yourself. But it’s not a sign of weakness; it’s a sign of great strength to do that.

“If men can find it within themselves to open up about their own experiences of eating disorders, you would find them in all walks of life and in every sport in the world.

“So, the more men talk about eating disorders, the easier it’s going be to bust the stigma that this is only a female problem. More importantly, (we can) raise awareness of the help needed and ensure the funding is in place.”

Owens continued: “As for me, I’m focusing on passing the fitness test for the 2019 world cup. What the challenges will be when I finish refereeing and I won’t have to train for something, I really know.

“But one thing I absolutely do know is that the bulimia can’t carry on. And I just hope that by speaking about my experience I can help many others reach the same conclusion.

“It’s not always easy to get the help you need when you need it. So, the sooner you start talking to people the better.

“Don’t be in my situation; 27 years on and still suffering from it,” he said.

I find it inspiring that Nigel Owens has chosen to go public about his struggle against bulimia. I hope others agree.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Wheelchair-users not able to board ships at major cruise port – so much for equality

wheelchair

A woman whose husband was told that she could not board a cruise ship at Liverpool, England, has me thinking. The woman has a disability and was denied access because she could not leave her wheelchair to board her ship.

When her husband tried to book the cruise, he was informed that the port of Liverpool doesn’t have equipment to assist people in wheelchairs. So, he was told that he could not book a place for his wife on the cruise.

wheelchair

Fred Olsen’s Boudicca at Liverpool Cruise Terminal (Pic: Wikimedia Commons).

Ann Fisher and her husband had wanted to travel on a seven-night Emerald Isle cruise with the Fred Olsen line.  But that plan sank when Fred Olsen said she had to leave her wheelchair and get up the gangway steps alone.

Mrs Fisher, a retired lecturer, had twice cruised with Fred Olsen from Liverpool. Now, though, a port policy change means she and her wheelchair have been left high and dry.

Speaking to cruise.co.uk, she said: “It’s quite devastating. I wouldn’t consider going from another port because of the travelling involved.”

Also, she wonders why she was able to cruise without hassle in the past, despite her disability: “It was so easy when we did it before. We got a taxi to Liverpool, and were in our cabin just over an hour from leaving home. It was ideal for someone like me who finds it difficult to travel.”

Liverpool port lacks wheelchair facilities

Her husband John Fisher confirmed that Ann’s disability had previously not been a problem. He said: “We were able to enjoy two Fred Olsen cruises from Liverpool in 2013 and 2014, occupying a wheelchair-adapted cabin.

“Access to and from the ship was easily accomplished. Four sturdy members of the crew lifted my wife’s wheelchair at the corners. Her chair is lightweight, as is she.”

A Fred Olsen spokesman said there is neither an overhead bridge nor a sloped gangway at the Port of Liverpool. As such, the company is restricted from assisting guests, who are fully confined to a wheelchair, to board ships.

I can sympathise with the Fishers but also with Fred Olsen. After all, health and safety regulations would not allow staff to manually lift a wheelchair and its occupant. It wouldn’t be safe for the occupant or the staff. Whatever happened in the past is irrelevant as it is no longer allowed. Period.

What does puzzle me is why the Port of Liverpool doesn’t have facilities to ensure people with disabilities have access. It is the 21st century, the UK’s Disability Discrimination Act requires companies to provide access for disabled people. Liverpool’s cruise terminal in only 10 years old. For it not to have such facilities is an absolute disgrace. Shame on you, Liverpool. It needs sorting out, NOW.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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