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News and Opinions about MS, Health & Disability

Nothing new promised by latest work and pensions secretary

The cabinet table seat of the work and pensions secretary must be fitted with an eject mechanism. Yet again, it has a new incumbent.

Indeed, in the 20 months since the sudden resignation of Iain Duncan Smith, the role has changed hands four times. And throughout that time, benefits for disabled people, including those with MS, have been under attack.

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Esther McVey, new work and pensions secretary.

UK prime minister Theresa May on Monday appointed Esther McVey as the latest to run the Department for Work and Pensions. For her, it means a return to the department where she was minister for disabled people from 2012 to 2013.

So, what can we expect from the new head of the government department responsible for disability benefits? Sorry, but I can only see more of the same.

Just look back at what she did while she was in that more junior ministerial role. Freelance journalist and blogger Paul Lewis (@paullewismoney) tweeted: “As Minister for Disabled People she (Esther McVey) said 300,000 people would lose their benefits under her changes and she cut the walking test to get PIP from less than 50m to less than 20m.”

Secretary dedicated to cutting benefits

Wonderful! The new secretary of state is another Conservative politician dedicated to cutting benefits paid to disabled people. We need another change – this time a change for the better.

There have been many, many reactions to news of Ms McVey’s appointment and I see little point in repeating them all here. Instead, if you are interested in more information and comment, I would recommend taking a look at Vox Political Online.

This is an excellent blog written by left-wing journalist Mike Siver. His contribution to this story is “Esther McVey is now Secretary of State for Work and Pensions. Expect many, many deaths”.

The headline may seem to be incendiary but is, nevertheless, a timely warning. After all, less than two months ago I brought you news that spending cuts had already led to 120,000 deaths. Needless deaths.

Bearing that in mind, Sivier’s headline looks quite reasonable.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor and cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult a doctor before starting a new diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.

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Needless deaths caused by government spending cuts

Health and social care spending cuts have led to 120,000 needless deaths over the last seven years. A report in the British Medical Journal exposed the dramatic figures.

Those are the very cuts that we with multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, and other diseases and disabilities, have consistently opposed.

The shocking total of the coyly named “excess deaths” is an indictment of UK governments since 2010. That includes the Conservative-led coalition of 2010-2015, the Conservative government of 2015-17, and the current one elected five months ago.

deathsBMJ Open, the online version of the journal, published a report of the paper: “Effects of health and social care spending constraints on mortality in England: a time trend analysis”. Johnathan Watkins of Pilar Research and Education, based in Cambridge, UK, was the lead author.

In its report, BMJ Open said:

The squeeze on public finances since 2010 is linked to nearly 120,000 excess deaths in England, with the over 60s and care home residents bearing the brunt, reveals the first study of its kind.

The critical factor in these figures may be changes in nurse numbers, say the researchers, who warn that there could be an additional toll of up to 100 deaths every day from now on in.

Between 2010 and 2014, the NHS in England has only had a real term annual increase in government funding of 1.3 per cent, despite rising patient demand and healthcare costs.

And real term spend on social care has fallen by 1.19 per cent every year during the same period, despite a significant projected increase in the numbers of over 85s–those most likely to need social care–from 1.6 million in 2015 to 1.8 million in 2020, say the researchers.

The spending restraints were associated with 45,368 excess deaths between 2010 and 2014 compared with equivalent trends before 2010.

Deaths related to cuts in social care funding

Most of these deaths were among the over 60s and care home residents. And every £10 drop in spend per head on social care was associated with five extra care home deaths per 100,000 of the population, the analysis showed.

These associations remained after further detailed analysis and taking account of global and national economic factors.

Changes in the numbers of hospital and community nurses were the most salient factors in the associations found between spend and care home deaths. From 2001 to 2010 nurse numbers rose by an average of 1.61% every year, but from 2010 to 2014 rose by just 0.07%–20 times lower than in the previous decade.

On the basis of the trends between 2009 and 2014, the researchers estimate that an extra 152,141 people could die between 2015 and 2020, equivalent to nearly 100 extra deaths every day.

The funds needed to close this ‘mortality gap’ would be £6.3 billion every year, or a total of £25.3 billion, they calculate.

So, Conservative cuts in social care spending have led to close to 120,000 people dying needlessly since 2010.

It’s a national disgrace.

And these figures do not include other deaths. For example, 2,400 Employment and Support Allowance claimants died within two weeks of being found fit for work. That was the figure revealed by the DWP in 2015, in response to a Freedom of Information request lodged by Mike Sivier of voxpolitical.com.

I wonder what the total is now, two years later.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

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Disabled politician condemns government’s ‘suffer and die’ policies

New Labour MP Jared O’Mara, who has a disability, has accused the Conservative government of introducing policies in the hope that disabled people will “suffer and die”. It is a view with which I find it hard to disagree.

O’Mara is now one of just a few disabled MPs, he has cerebral palsy, in the UK´s House of Commons. At the general election, he won Sheffield Hallam from former Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg. Clegg was also deputy prime minister in the 2010-2015 Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government.

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Jared O’Mara MP.

Speaking to Disability News Service (DNS), O’Mara said he knew that his comments would be controversial. But he said he firmly believed that Tory ministers had “completely torn up the welfare system” which had previously supported disabled people. He particularly criticised cuts and reforms to disability benefits, the decision to close the Independent Living Fund, and cuts to social care.

“They want disabled people to suffer and die. That’s literally what’s happening.

“Disabled people are out there suffering and dying because they have not got the financial means and financial support and nor have they got the legal means to lead an equal life, or even to lead a satisfactory life.

“I’m not going to shy away from it, people might say I am taking it too far, but as far as I am concerned, what I have seen and what has happened across the board, it’s been eugenics1.”

He promised that he would be “taking no prisoners” as an MP, and would “call them out on this”.

He said: “There are people just like me and people who have got conditions that make things even worse for them than mine does, and they are dying and they are suffering.

“I am in it to shine a light where the mainstream (media) do not shine a light and where the Tories (Conservatives) are turning their backs.”

He said he “absolutely” endorses efforts by user-led anti-cuts groups such as Black Triangle to secure a criminal prosecution of Duncan Smith and fellow former work and pensions minister Chris Grayling.

In December, Scottish authorities decided not to investigate the refusal of the two ministers to improve the safety of the government’s “fitness for work” test. This was despite evidence that the refusal caused the deaths of at least three benefit claimants with mental health conditions.

Coroner warned DWP about disabled tests

This evidence mirrored flaws uncovered by a coroner in January 2010, following an earlier suicide. The coroner passed his findings, as a warning to the Department for Work and Pensions.  This was a few weeks before Duncan Smith and Grayling took up their new posts following the 2010 general election.

Duncan Smith and Grayling failed to act on the coroner’s warning.  Campaigners, and families of some of those who died, believe this failure led to further deaths.

O’Mara said: “The legal system is ‘innocent until proven guilty’. We need to ascertain that (innocence or guilt) with what Iain Duncan Smith and Chris Grayling did.

“If they’ve not done anything wrong then they can walk free. If they have done wrong then they can be punished.

“I believe there is a case to answer and they should go there. I support that campaign without reservation,” he said.

1 Eugenics is the idea that society can be improved by selecting those who are allowed to survive and breed (definitions of eugenics vary).

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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