UA-79233833-1

50shadesofsun

News and Opinions about MS, Health & Disability

Steps to Overcoming MS but MS Society warns diet is unproven

Overcoming MS (OMS) is a popular, yet unproven, diet and lifestyle programme for people with MS. And in just under two weeks, on Sunday October 22, you can learn more about it at an OMS conference in Brighton, UK.

OMS

Professor George Jelinek (Pic: Overcoming MS).

Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis claims to promote the integration of diet and lifestyle changes into standard medical management to improve the health and lives of people with multiple sclerosis”. Professor George Jelinek, of Melbourne, Australia, developed the OMS Recovery Programme more than 15 years ago. He received a diagnosis of MS in 1999.

OMS started in Australia and New Zealand. It is a non-profit organization and accepts no funding from the pharmaceutical industry. In 2011, it formed a charity in the UK to with the aim of making the OMS programme available worldwide.

omsThe one-day conference is to include a number of presentations These are to focus on the seven steps of the recovery programme: diet, sunlight and vitamin D, exercise, meditation, medication, preventing family members from getting MS, and doing whatever it takes to overcome MS.

Organisers say the event will be of value to anyone, whether newly diagnosed, new to OMS or someone who has already been on the recovery programme for some time.

OMS step by step

So, what’s in the OMS recovery programme? To summarise:

  • Diet and supplements
    • A plant-based wholefood diet plus seafood, with no saturated fat, as far as is practical
    • Omega-3 fatty acid supplements: Take 20-40mls of flaxseed oil daily; fish oil can be used instead if desired
    • Optional B group vitamins or B12 supplement if needed
  • Vitamin D

    • Sunlight 15 minutes daily 3-5 times a week as close to all over as practical
    • Vitamin D3 supplement of at least 5000IU daily, adjusted to blood level
    • Aim to keep blood level of vitamin D high, that is between 150-225nmol/L (may require up to 10,000IU daily)
  • Meditation

    • 30 minutes daily
  • Exercise

    • 20-30 minutes around five times a week, preferably outdoors
  • Medication

    • In consultation with your doctor, if a wait and see approach is not appropriate, take one of the disease-modifying drugs (many may not need a drug, and drug selection should be carefully weighed against side effects)
    • Steroids for any acute relapse that is distressing
    • One of the more potent drugs if the disease is rapidly progressive

The MS Society, on its website, has expressed a note of caution. It says there is no conclusive evidence of the benefits of the proposed diet, a key component of the programme. It warns that the diet may not provide enough protein and may be too low in energy.

omsThe society says: “The OMS diet recommendations are similar to the Swank diet. It advocates cutting out dairy and meat, and reducing fat intake – particularly saturated fat. It also recommends supplementation, particularly with omega 3 (in the form of fish oil or flaxseed oil) and vitamin D if your exposure to sunlight is limited.

“Research into this diet has not provided conclusive evidence of its benefits. However, as with the Swank diet, following the OMS programme is not likely to be considered bad for you.

“You should make sure you’re getting enough protein in your diet, through eating plenty of fish, beans or pulses. Likewise, the diet may be low in energy, so it may not be suitable for you if you have high energy needs or you are already underweight,” says the society.

* * * * *

Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

* * * * *

50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

4 Comments »

Care cuts put those in need at risk

Vulnerable people are at risk because social work budgets cuts make it impossible to prepare meaningful care packages. And that is besides cuts to the government’s welfare benefits.

It’s the job of social workers to assess what support someone needs to keep them safe and able to live independently. Community Care magazine and the Care and Support Alliance, of which the MS Society is a member, surveyed social workers. The survey asked about the challenges they face trying to get people the care they need.

social workersIn response, the social workers criticised the devastating impact cuts are having on people who rely on care and support.

Almost 500 UK social workers took part in the survey. Their comments reveal the incredibly difficult position they’re often in, as they increasingly have to restrict or remove care entirely. What’s more, that is due solely to lack of resources, as local councils struggle to balance their budgets.

One social worker said: “[There is] strong pressure from my line manager and commissioners to reduce costs as a main priority.”

Meanwhile, another commented: “Colleagues constantly battle to keep packages at an adequate level to support clients.”

Social workers tell of appalling cuts in care

Their descriptions of what cuts can mean in practice to people who need care were appalling:

One wrote: “A person with hoarding issues and a tendency to eat rotten food had their shopping and housework call cut, resulting in an admission to hospital with food poisoning.”

Another response said: “The person requires support with walking to the bathroom, but due to the cost he is now required to contribute towards it. [Instead,] he has decided he would rather have the risk of falling than [pay for] an evening call.”

MS Society chief executive Michelle Mitchell, said: “This report lays bare the realities social workers face thanks to a system that hasn’t been properly funded for decades. Our own research shows that too many people with MS are bearing the brunt of cuts. One in three [are] not getting support with essential everyday tasks.

“The government has promised to improve the social care system and additional funding and reform has to come quickly. People who desperately rely on care shouldn’t be forced to keep paying the price.”

                                                                                 * * * * *
Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.
                                                                                 * * * * *
50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Clinical Writer with Healthline, the fastest growing health information site. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

1 Comment »

Government figures prove UN’s human catastrophe verdict

Shocking new figures underline the facts behind a UN committee’s decision to describe UK welfare benefits as a human catastrophe.

And the figures come from the government’s Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). Not that they were provided willingly. The MS Society forced them out by a freedom of information request.

During the first three years of Personal Independence Payment (PIP), people with MS have lost at least £6 million a year in benefits, according to the society. PIP started to replace Disability Living Allowance (DLA) in 2013.

The Department for Work and Pensions admitted that between October 2013 and October 2016:

  • almost one in three people (2,600) with MS who received the highest rate mobility component of DLA had their payments cut after they were reassessed for PIP.
  • nearly a quarter (800) who received the highest rate for the care component of DLA had their payments cut after being reassessed for PIP.

System doesn’t make sense

reassessed

Genevieve Edwards (pic: MS Society).

MS Society director of external affairs, Genevieve Edwards, said: “These staggering figures show how PIP is failing some people with MS who need the highest level of support.

“It doesn’t make sense that people are losing money they once qualified for, when they are living with a progressive condition.” I agree, the disease gets worse progressively, not better.

The society is rightly worried that many people no longer get what they were entitled to, and should still be able to claim. Their individual situations are no better but their care benefits have been cut.

One problem is when people are unable to explain the reality of living with MS when reassessed for PIP. And assessors, who are of dubious quality, rarely understand how unpredictable it can be.

Harder to get highest rate mobility under PIP

Additionally, it’s now also harder to qualify for the highest rate of mobility support for PIP. And that’s what you need to take advantage of the Motability car scheme.

Before the changes, under the DLA claimants wouldn’t receive the highest level of support if they could walk more than 50m. Now, under PIP, they won’t get the higher rate if they can walk more than 20m – including the use of sticks or walking aids, if needed.

Exactly what the basis of that change is, I just don’t know but it is unfair. Interestingly, on May 4 last year Baroness Altmann, then minister of state at the DWP, said in the House of Lords: “I would like to clarify what appears to be a widespread misconception regarding the differences between the mobility assessment in PIP and the mobility assessment in DLA. (See my post of May 16, 2016, Disability: There is no 20-metre rule, says minister).

“Many noble Lords have spoken of a ‘20-metre rule’, but there is no such rule. Some people believe that we have changed the assessment of a distance a claimant is able to walk from 50 metres to 20 metres. This is not the case.”

What a load of absolute codswallop.

  • Have the requirements changed between being assessed for DLA and being reassessed for PIP? YES.
  • Is the cut off for highest rate mobility payment now being unable to walk 20m instead of 50m? YES.
  • Did Baroness Altmann lie? Well by archaic tradition, she cannot be accused of lying as she made the statement in the House. She can only be guilty of “misleading the House”. It is clear, she did mislead the House.

Now, what is a non-parliamentary term for deliberately misleading the House? Let me think. Oh yes, I remember, it is LYING.

Fix this broken system, MS Society demands

The MS Society is calling on the government to urgently fix “this broken system” and ensure PIP assessments reflect the realities of living with MS. I couldn’t agree more.

“Having MS is hard enough. It shouldn’t be made harder by a system that doesn’t make sense,” said Ms Edwards.

And so say all of us. 

* * * * *

Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

* * * * *

50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Clinical Writer with Healthline, the fastest growing health information site. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

No Comments »

Silly season lacks real news stories – whether general or about disabilities

It’s silly season right now. At least, it is in the UK and many other countries. In the US, it is called the slow news season. Elsewhere it can be called cucumber time, or another such term.

The reason, of course, is that at this time of year news is harder to come by. Yes, there are still things going on but in the northern hemisphere parliaments and congresses have long summer breaks. So do courts. South of the equator, the season tends to refer to a period surrounding the Christmas and New Year holidays. Remember, December and January are summer months there.

silly seasonSilly season is a term with which I am quite familiar, having spent my career in journalism. I know full well about the scarcity of real news during the summer.

And that’s why we see frivolous news items in the Press that would not be likely otherwise. Frivolous items that give rise to the term ‘silly season’.

It’s true, too, for news about disabilities. Whatever, and however, a disability affects us – developments are scarce during these months. Changes to benefits? Sorry, no, the government is on holiday.

The independent organization Benefits and Work publishes a regular newsletter, but not during the silly season. In its last edition on July 17, it said: “This is our last newsletter, and money-off coupon, until Friday September 6. Parliament is about to go into recess and will return on September 5, briefly, before the conference season begins.

Silly season = slow news

“That should mean that we are spared any more new initiatives or bogus consultations before the Autumn and gives us all a chance to recharge our batteries. But, if anything dramatic does occur relating to benefits, we’ll bring out a special edition.”

In the UK, parliament has not met since July 20 and returns on September 5. In the US, congress finished one week later, on July 28, but also restarts on September 5.

Any news about developments in new drugs and treatment of diseases such as multiple sclerosis? No, not at all. The last news update on the website of the MS Society was posted on June 30. In the USA, the National MS Society last posted a news item on August 8 – and that wasn’t about MS. It was about the congress summer holiday.

And don’t expect to take your benefits claim to court either. The UK High Court’s summer break lasts from August 1 to the beginning of October.

Oh well, it looks as though the news media will, once again, have to resort to the frivolous.

* * * * *

Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

* * * * *

50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Healthline, the fastest growing health information site. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

 

 

No Comments »

MS Walk discount for early registration

Every charity associated with any kind of disease, disorder or other health issue always needs to raise money. This may be used for all-important research, much need care, or raising public awareness.

Multiple sclerosis societies in countries all over the world are no different in this respect. Their work all needs money.

The UK’s MS Society is holding one of its major fundraising events, the popular MS Walk, in September. And there is a special offer for anyone who wants to take part.

So, anyone planning to signi up to join the walk should do so by this Wednesday, that’s July 12. That way they can take advantage of a 20% discount on the cost of the registration fees. These are £15 for adults, £7 for under 18s and free for five years and under.

ms walk

Having fun at last year’s MS Walk. (Pic: MS Society).

Helen, of the society’s community and events team, says: “Registration is now open for the annual MS Walk and for one week only, we’ve got a special offer on our sign-up fees! As the offer is only open until the July 12, so you need to be quick to avoid disappointment.”

Furthermore, anyone who wants to walk, roll or stroll, every step will take the society closer to its goal.

Hundreds of MS Superstars, friends and families, will join forces in London to take in the sights and raise funds to stop MS.

Both the MS Walk’s short and medium routes are fully accessible and all three start and finish in Battersea Park. At the end of the challenge the society will celebrate everyone’s achievement with food, drinks, music and fun in the park.

The three routes are:

  • Short / 6km route – Fully accessible
  • Medium / 10km route – Fully accessible
  • Long / 20km route – Please get in touch with the society if you’d like to find out more about the accessibility of this route.

Helen continues: “MS Walk is fun for the whole family. They can walk or wheel one of three picturesque London routes on Sunday September 24.

“Last year, Paralympic swimmer and MS Society Ambassador, Stephanie Millward, walked with us. Stephanie lives with MS, and wasn’t sure about taking part.”

MS Walk ‘believe you can’

Stephanie was made an MBE in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list. She explains: “When I was asked to attend the MS Walk, I thought ‘Me? Can I do a five, 10 or 20 kilometre walk? No chance. I would never be able to do that.’ But then I thought ‘yes – you can do anything if you believe you can’.”

If you feel inspired to join in the fun and help the MS Society turn the streets of London orange this September, register now.

And don’t forget to sign up by Wednesday to take advantage of the special offer to gain a 20% discount!

To register go to https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ms-walk-2017-registration-34660345025 and use the code MSW20 to get the 20% discount.

After signing up, all participants will receive:

  • An MS Society orange t-shirt
  • An event day pack with detailed maps and information
  • An invitation to a fantastic post-event celebration in Battersea Park
  • Lots of tips and advice from the MS Society team to help them raise as much as they can
  • Support on the day from MS Society staff and volunteers

* * * * *

Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

* * * * *

50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

No Comments »

Volunteer family carers not appreciated by government, new poll shows

carers

Those who provide unpaid care for loved ones are not appreciated enough, according to a new poll. Carers in the UK are the same as caregivers in the USA.

The online poll was designed to find what the public thinks about carers. It was run by the Multiple Sclerosis Society which says the major findings are:

  • More than 7 in 10 (74%) feel carers aren’t valued enough by society for the support they provide. This rises to 83% for those who have experience of caring.
  • The cost of care and its impact on people’s finances is the top worry for people who’ve never had a caring experience (47%). Coping with the stress of caring is the second biggest worry (43%)
  • Nearly a third (32%) who’ve never cared for someone said they would worry they didn’t have the skills or experience to become a carer.
  • Almost a quarter (23%) of those who’ve never cared said they wouldn’t know or understand what help would be available if they became a carer.

According to the society’s website: “These findings are really worrying, as we know people with MS receive a huge amount of support from family or friends.

“Our recent report on social care and the MS community in England showed 85% of people with MS received some level of unpaid care, support or assistance from family and friends in 2016.

“More than a third (36%) of people who need support told us they rely solely on unpaid care,” it said.

Care for the carers

MS Society chief executive Michelle Mitchell said: “More than 100,000 people in the UK live with MS, and we know that unpaid carers make a world of difference in helping people manage this unpredictable condition.

“We know that caring can be really difficult though, and more can be done to better recognise and support them. That’s why we’re joining other charities to urge our new government to set out its plan for how support for carers can be improved.”

Some chance! Based on the despicable record of the last government, I won’t hold my breath waiting for improvements for carers.

The new UK government is led by the same Conservative party. A party which is without care or compassion.

Disability welfare benefits were cut by the last government. There is no sign of any change of heart. The only glimmer of hope is that, under prime minister Theresa May, the Conservatives no longer have an absolute majority. There is just a chance they can be outvoted in the House of Commons.

We live in hope.

* * * * *

Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

* * * * *

50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

No Comments »

Disabilities: Government warned forced activities ‘could make health worse’

orange

Plans for people with disabilities to be forced to undertake ‘mandatory activities’, even though they have already been assessed as being unfit for work, is being opposed by disability groups such as the MS Society.

It is good to see the society urging the UK government to scrap plans, included in the Green Paper Improving Lives, that would require people in the support group of Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) to participate in those activities or risk facing cuts to their benefits.

disabilityThe ‘Green Paper’ is a supposed consultation document that sets out what the government calls its 10-year vision for helping people with chronic conditions – who can and want to – find and stay in work. It also includes other areas, such as health and changes to disability benefits.

In a statement issued on Friday, the MS Society said: “We’re really concerned about changes to disability benefits proposed in the Government’s Green Paper on work, health and disability. And we let them know in our detailed response today.”

Society policy manager Laura Wetherly said: “The government must recognise that many people with MS simply can’t work because of their condition and may not be able to return to work in the future. For these people, work has become impossible and in some cases could actually make their health worse.

“Putting pressure on people already deemed unfit for work won’t help their condition improve, will only make the system more stressful for them, and won’t help to close the disability employment gap. We’re urging the Government to make the welfare system make sense – the most vulnerable people need to be properly supported.”

According to the government’s own figures, of the people with MS claiming ESA, 92% are in the support group and are currently people not expected to carry out any work-related activity.

The MS Society says its January survey of more than 1,300 people with the disease revealed:

  • Almost two thirds of respondents (64%) say they are not employed.
  • Over half (53%) of this group say they would ideally like to work, but the vast majority (77%) say their MS means it’s not possible for them to work.
  • 62% of those not working feel they couldn’t return to work even with appropriate support.

According to Government figures, of the people with MS claiming ESA, 92% are in the support group. Currently people in this group are not expected to carry out any work-related activity as they tend to have the very highest support needs.

On its website, the society highlights the story of Carole Bennett, who is 58 and from Leeds, was diagnosed with MS in 2003. It says:

Around five years ago, she had to give up her job as a local government officer because her symptoms became too severe to carry on. Shortly after, she started receiving ESA.

Carole says: “I wouldn’t be able to do anything without this money – it’s my main form of income. I do very little as it is because the amount I get is only just enough to get by on. I enjoyed my job and if my health was better, I’d love to get back into work. But MS is so unpredictable – some days are better than others and I never know when I’m going to be ok. If I were forced to look for a new job now, the stress would make my symptoms worse and my life would be even harder than it is at the moment.”

I firmly believe that the plans should have no place in what, in the 21st century, should be a caring, tolerant and decent society.

strap-new

ian-skype_edited50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease/disorder-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

No Comments »

MS takes centre stage on television soap

orange

soap

First, I have a confession to make, I don’t watch soap operas on television but the fact is they do attract huge and often passionate audiences.

They develop different story lines from time to time, and the newest such story in one leading TV soap in the UK is one of its main characters being diagnosed with relapsing MS.

In a recent episode of Channel 4’s Hollyoaks soap opera, set in a fictional suburb of the English city Chester, character Nancy Osborne met with her neurologist to hear the results of an MRI scan. In previous months, viewers had seen the character, played by actress Jessica Fox, experience a series of unexplained symptoms including weakness, tremor and spasms.

Nancy is a young mum in her late 20s who’s been involved in numerous main storylines since 2005. She’s married to Darren Osborne and is the deputy headteacher at Hollyoaks High.

Doubts have already been expressed about how well the television company will treat the story. Some comments on Facebook questioned if such a serious disease would be handled in the right way and if it would be true to life, but I am reassured that the programme makers are trying their very best.

The country’s leading multiple sclerosis charity, the MS Society, has confirmed that it has been consulted and has cooperated with the programme makers.

On its website, the charity says: “The scriptwriters got in touch with us to ask for advice about MS. We were happy to give them accurate information about MS and its symptoms, but we know it’s up to Hollyoaks to decide how they use our feedback.

soap

Kirsty and Lottie (Pic: Kirsty, via MS Society).

 

“We also introduced the scriptwriters to people with MS who shared their own experiences of the condition. One of the people we asked was Kirsty, who’s a 32-year-old accountant and mum to four-year-old Lottie. She was joined by her close friends, sisters Kat Garner and Vicki Bithell, whose parents have MS.”

Kirsty told the MS Society: “This was the first time I opened up to such a large group of people about how I feel about my MS.

“At one point, I got quite choked up, but we really wanted to show what it’s like living with MS and how it feels to watch someone you love battle often debilitating symptoms every day.”

It will be interesting to see how the storyline progresses and how well Nancy can cope with living with MS.

strap-new

ian-skype_edited50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease/disorder-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

No Comments »

MS Society Award Nominations: We All Are Stars

orange

Nominations are being sought for individuals and groups for the U.K.’s MS Society Awards 2017. Organizers say the awards will recognize the stars of the MS community and their contributions during 2016.

While not wishing to denigrate the awards in any way, I cannot help but feel that all of us who have, or are affected by, multiple sclerosis are stars in our own ways.

Everyone who is an MS warrior and determined never to give up is a star. Every family member caring for someone with MS is a star. Every volunteer who raises money for the cause is a star.

These awards will not find any stars better than our own, but the awards should gain some well-deserved publicity for the MS Society.

awardsCategories for which nominations are now open are:

MS Society group. This award is open to any MS Society group across the U.K.

Carer. The care and support provided by this person, who will be a family member, partner or friend, will have made a real and positive difference to the life of someone with MS.

Young Carer (under 18). The care provided by this young person, who will be a family member or friend, will have made a real and positive difference to the life of someone with MS.

Campaigner. The campaigner of the year award recognizes an inspiring individual who has campaigned to raise awareness of MS or improve policy or services for people affected by MS.

Digital media. This award is aimed at anyone (individual, team or organization) who has delivered outstanding and innovative results through digital media for the benefit of the MS community.

Employer. Judges are looking for organizations that create an excellent working environment for staff and show consistent consideration and awareness of the fluctuating nature of MS.

Fundraiser. Your nominee may have taken part in an exciting one-off activity, or have shown commitment to long-term fundraising for the MS Society over 2016. Your submission should include the amount of money they’ve raised, as well as details of how many people were involved in organizing and/or taking part in the fundraising activity.

Young Fundraiser (under 18). It’s inspiring to see young people getting involved and making a positive difference to the world. We want to recognize their achievements and encourage them to continue to be a force for change in the future.

Media. Nominations for this category will need to show how media coverage has been positive and accurate. Journalists should demonstrate how their work has impacted its audience and/or provide links to the story.

Professional. This award is open to all health and social care professionals whose work centers around people affected by MS, and improving their access to treatment, care and support.

Political Supporter. This award recognizes the work of political supporters in seeking to improve access to responsive treatment, care and support for people affected by MS. This includes all politicians who held office in 2016 across the U.K, from local to national level.

Research. This category recognizes world class research projects that are working hard to beat MS. These projects must be based in the UK.

Volunteer. This award is open to individuals or groups of MS Society volunteers. These submissions may address one or more of the following: Information, education, therapies, support, social events, advocacy, transport or anything else.

Nomination forms and guidance notes can be found on the MS Society website.

All nominations must be received by 5 p.m. on Feb. 10, 2017.

This article, written by me, was first published by Multiple Sclerosis News Today.

strap-new

ian-skype_edited50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease/disorder-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

No Comments »

Paralympians with MS delighted to receive national honours

orange

Two Paralympians with multiple sclerosis, who won gold medals in Rio in 2016, are delighted to have had their efforts recognized in their country’s New Year Honours list.

Kadeena Cox and Stephanie Millward have both been made a Member of the Order of the British Empire, which is denoted by adding the letters MBE after their names.

Paralympians

Kadeena Cox.

Both took to Twitter to express their pleasure. Kadeena, who received her award for service to athletics, tweeted: “SPOTY (BBC TV Sports Personality of the Year) nomination now MBE, 2016 couldn’t have been a better year. Thanks for all the support and here’s to a great 2017.”

Paralympians.

Stephanie Millward.

And Stephanie, whose award was for her services to swimming, tweeted: “Thank you everyone 4 following me &supporting me for an amazing GOLD & MBE in 2016! Good luck for 2017!! I hope all your dreams come true!”

Kadeena, aged 25, lives in Leeds, West Yorkshire, and was diagnosed with MS two years ago. As featured here on September 18, she won gold medals in both cycling and athletics in Rio, becoming the first Briton since 1988 to win a medal in two sports at the same Paralympics. This was recognized publicly when she was selected to be Great Britain’s flag bearer at the games’ closing ceremony.

Stephanie, is 35 and lives in Corsham, Wiltshire. She was diagnosed with MS at the age of 17 and embarked on an 18-year journey to the top of the Paralympic podium, winning two gold medals at Rio.

Paralympians

MS Society Ambassadors Stephanie Millward (left) and Kadeena Cox. (Pic:: MS Society).

Both women are Ambassadors of the UK’s MS Society, on behalf of which Ian Fannon said: “We’re absolutely thrilled for Kadeena and Stephanie to be recognized in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours List. They’ve both had a phenomenal year and these awards pay tribute to their dedication and achievements.

“We’re so proud to have Kadeena and Stephanie as MS Society Ambassadors, helping to raise awareness about this challenging and unpredictable condition.”

To that, I must add my congratulations for the great efforts and achievements of these Paralympians and MS warriors and for their subsequent well-deserved honours.

strap-new

ian-skype_edited50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease/disorder-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

 

No Comments »