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News and Opinions about MS, Health & Disability

Impact of MS on life need not always be negative

MS does impact my life. That may seem to be an obvious statement but let’s look a little deeper. There is more to this than meets the eye.

Yes, of course, this disease has many negative impacts on me, my life and my loving wife Lisa. But not every impact is necessarily negative. What? I hear you ask, have I found some ways in which MS has had a positive effect?

The answer has to be ‘yes’, no doubt about that.

Naturally, I can only talk about myself and not everyone’s experience will be the same. But, hey, that is multiple sclerosis – where no two people have exactly the same symptoms.

My symptoms mainly impact my mobility and balance so, outdoors, I need mobility aids. I use a rollator (basically a walker on wheels with brakes and a seat on which to rest) for short distances and a wheelchair for anything longer. I also have to cope with urinary urgency and continence issues.

So, what ‘positives’ can I draw from having MS?

Positive impact

There are many, including:

  • meeting a host of people, both in person and by telephone or online, that I would otherwise not have met;
  • new and often unexpected friendships;
  • writing for both MS and medical online publications;
  • using an electric powered wheelchair to restore some independence and to give Lisa a break from pushing me around;
  • visiting Moscow, somewhere I never thought I’d go, to check out its HSCT centre. My existing (non-MS) health did not make me a suitable candidate but the visit was worthwhile. And I saw the Kremlin, Red Square, the home of the Bolshoi Ballet, the former headquarters of the KGB, and more;
  • avoiding queues, or lines. From Radio City Music Hall, New York, through getting on and off cruise ships, to taking commercial airline flights, wheelchair users are given special and welcome treatment;
  • courteous treatment. Wherever I go, staff of shops, restaurants, everywhere are only too happy to help. And, more than that, even members of the public are willing to open doors, clear a way for me, and generally offer assistance.

These are just some examples. It’s by no means meant to be an exhaustive list.

Someone I have known for some time asked me the other day: “Surely, you don’t mean that you feel good about having MS?”

No, of course I don’t. Naturally, I’d be much happier to have a clean bill of health. But, as that isn’t the case, let’s make the best of it.

MS is not a reason to give up.

We are warriors. We must all look for the best in life and fight on.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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impact50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Clinical Writer with Healthline, the fastest growing health information site. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Good and bad days on the MS merry-go-round of life

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Pride becomes before a fall, or so the saying goes, and that certainly seems true for me.  I had been getting around a lot more easily, feeling pleased, using my new rollator but then …

Ok, all of us who live with multiple sclerosis have good and bad days. Good days when we find it fairly easy to get around or do things; bad days when the opposite is true.

Two days ago, all was well. I was out and about and used my rollator to help me walk into our local pharmacy to collect my medications. Feeling comfortable and at ease, I felt strong and confident.

Then I drove home where, again using my rollator, walked up the ramp to the front door and went indoors.

Yesterday, regretfully, was not the same story. Not by a long shot!

I went out the front door, started down the ramp and my legs soon felt shaky and my arms so weak that I was unable to support myself on the rollator. It was no surprise when I sank to the ground. After a few minutes, by sitting on the side of the ramp, I managed to regain my feet and made my way to the back of our car, where Lisa had my wheelchair ready.

Bad days are not so easy

All that was left to do was to walk across some gravel and transfer from the rollator to my wheelchair. Easy right? Well, yes, on a good day. Even on a moderate day. But yesterday was neither of those, it was a very bad day; bad to ******* awful.

And that’s why my easy transfer ended up causing me to fall again, this time in the quiet road outside our home. The sky was blue, the sun blazing down. It was midday, and very hot. Remember, we live in the south of Spain and today it got to 37°C, which is almost 99°F, and that’s the shade temperature. I was in direct sunlight, the humidity was high. It was hot. It’s been like that for weeks.

I made several unsuccessful attempts to get up but, eventually, Lisa phoned for help. In next to no time Eddie and Bob arrived and got me off the road surface and safely back in my wheelchair.

Difficulty resolved. Today is another day, I wonder what that will bring. Let’s hope it is a good one.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Wheelchair-users not able to board ships at major cruise port – so much for equality

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A woman whose husband was told that she could not board a cruise ship at Liverpool, England, has me thinking. The woman has a disability and was denied access because she could not leave her wheelchair to board her ship.

When her husband tried to book the cruise, he was informed that the port of Liverpool doesn’t have equipment to assist people in wheelchairs. So, he was told that he could not book a place for his wife on the cruise.

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Fred Olsen’s Boudicca at Liverpool Cruise Terminal (Pic: Wikimedia Commons).

Ann Fisher and her husband had wanted to travel on a seven-night Emerald Isle cruise with the Fred Olsen line.  But that plan sank when Fred Olsen said she had to leave her wheelchair and get up the gangway steps alone.

Mrs Fisher, a retired lecturer, had twice cruised with Fred Olsen from Liverpool. Now, though, a port policy change means she and her wheelchair have been left high and dry.

Speaking to cruise.co.uk, she said: “It’s quite devastating. I wouldn’t consider going from another port because of the travelling involved.”

Also, she wonders why she was able to cruise without hassle in the past, despite her disability: “It was so easy when we did it before. We got a taxi to Liverpool, and were in our cabin just over an hour from leaving home. It was ideal for someone like me who finds it difficult to travel.”

Liverpool port lacks wheelchair facilities

Her husband John Fisher confirmed that Ann’s disability had previously not been a problem. He said: “We were able to enjoy two Fred Olsen cruises from Liverpool in 2013 and 2014, occupying a wheelchair-adapted cabin.

“Access to and from the ship was easily accomplished. Four sturdy members of the crew lifted my wife’s wheelchair at the corners. Her chair is lightweight, as is she.”

A Fred Olsen spokesman said there is neither an overhead bridge nor a sloped gangway at the Port of Liverpool. As such, the company is restricted from assisting guests, who are fully confined to a wheelchair, to board ships.

I can sympathise with the Fishers but also with Fred Olsen. After all, health and safety regulations would not allow staff to manually lift a wheelchair and its occupant. It wouldn’t be safe for the occupant or the staff. Whatever happened in the past is irrelevant as it is no longer allowed. Period.

What does puzzle me is why the Port of Liverpool doesn’t have facilities to ensure people with disabilities have access. It is the 21st century, the UK’s Disability Discrimination Act requires companies to provide access for disabled people. Liverpool’s cruise terminal in only 10 years old. For it not to have such facilities is an absolute disgrace. Shame on you, Liverpool. It needs sorting out, NOW.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Mobility aids need to be embraced, not feared

We often say that we are people with disabilities, not disabled people. That is, we are people first. I agree with that view, and have said so before.

The overall point is that we are all individuals, we are not our diseases. But some run the risk of taking that too far as they refuse to use aids that would make their lives easier.

Take mobility problems as an example. It is not unknown for some people to show reluctance to even using a walking stick or cane.

That same reluctance seems to exhibit itself at every stage that mobility deteriorates. Each new piece of equipment designed to overcome a difficulty in walking. They include the use of two canes, a walker, a rollator, a wheelchair and, ultimately, a powered wheelchair or a scooter.

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In one of my wheelchairs on a Mediterranean beach, close to my home.

I make no secret of the fact that I have mobility issues, caused by multiple sclerosis. At home, I manage to move around using furniture and walls for support. But, even doing that, I can still fall. Outdoors, I can´t walk a step without support of one type or another. Even with support, I can walk about 15 yards before looking for a place to sit down.

That was the reason I decided to buy a rollator, a form of walker on wheels with brakes like a bicycle and parking brakes too. Add to that a built-in seat and, when I need one, I have my own chair.

Mobility aids are tools to help

I looked at using a rollator as a positive step. Instead, it allows me to walk more safely and take a break whenever needed without any risk of falling.

To travel any greater distances, I use a wheelchair but this is a tool not a way of life.

For me, a wheelchair is not a last resort, not something to dread. Instead, I look at it as a valuable tool that gets me to go places I couldn’t otherwise reach. So, instead of being disabled, I consider myself wheelchair-enabled.

What’s more, when using my electric wheelchair (I have an older, manual one as well) I am also independent as I can go places by myself.

To anyone who has a mobility difficulty, my message is simple. Don’t be afraid to try the next aid. You might be surprised by how much it helps you.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Humour? We are falling over ourselves laughing

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When you live with a disability, whether through multiple sclerosis or another cause, humour can help. It may be a twisted form, but it’s still humour.

I find that, these days, laughter comes when it is least expected.

It can come after I end up on the floor at home, especially if that is because I misjudged the distance to a chair or a hand grip. Instead of sitting there and pounding the floor with my fist, while crying “Why me?”, usually I see the funny side and just laugh at my own predicament.

That’s not to say that I never ‘lose it’ and curse this damned disease but, normally, the laughter takes over. In fact, as if getting up from the floor isn’t difficult enough, often I have to wait until I can stop laughing. Then, and only then, can I begin to pull myself up again.

Out and about, I use a rollator to walk just a few yards, such as from our home to the car outside. For any longer journey, I rely on a motorized wheelchair.

That, in itself, can be another source of humour. My very first motorized mobility aid was a second-hand scooter that I bought on eBay. It opened up a whole new world but the inaugural trip wasn’t uneventful. In our local park, I messed up and almost ended up in the paddling pool. Fortunately, disaster was averted and Lisa and I ended up laughing at my near miss.

Bare butt humour

A couple of years ago, we were visiting Lisa eldest sister who lives in New York state, about a half hour train ride from the city. We enjoyed a meal with sister Gen, her husband, three children and two of her grandchildren.

After her offspring and grandchildren had left, I managed to fall in the downstairs ‘half bathroom’ which is a room with a washbasin and toilet. The problem on this occasion was a loose mat that proved too much for me and my limited mobility to handle.

I was in a confined space and managed to get to my knees but not any further. I needed help and had to wait for Gen’s son to return for him to render assistance. My trousers and underpants were both around my thighs and, being on my knees with my arms on the toilet, everyone got a great view of my butt. Much mirth and laughter from everyone, especially after Gen’s husband Billy said he’d fallen in love with it. Enough said!

Actually, earlier on that same trip, Lisa and I were in Honolulu and used a vehicle converted to carry a wheelchair. I was loaded on in my chair, secured and off we went. What I hadn’t realized was that he driver ad secured the rear of the chair but not the front.  The first I knew about that was when the driver pulled away from some traffic lights like Sebastian Vettel stating a motor racing grand prix.

No longer sitting upright

The start threw me and my chair backwards. This was unnoticed by either the driver or my beloved wife, sitting in the front.  Grabbed their attention by saying “You might like to know that I am no longer sitting upright.” Lisa looked back and saw my feet in midair. She asked if I was hurt and when assured that I was ok, she just burst out laughing, me too.

Not the driver, though. He was so apologetic, and stopped to pick me up and this time secured the chair at the front as well. The poor man was so sorry and worried that he’d lo-se his job but we were too busy laughing. We did not complain.

The lesson I have learned is that you can’t take yourself too seriously.

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Affiliate disclaimer: This affiliate disclosure details the affiliate relationships of MS, Health & Disability at 50shadesofsun.com with other companies and products. Read more.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a Features Writer with Medical News Today. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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How will MS develop? Worry is pointless

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Am I concerned about the future? Do I worry about how multiple sclerosis will affect me as the years pass by? Does the future feel like a threat?

Well, the short answer to all three is “no”.

The reasons for this are not because of any insensitivity to, nor ignorance of, how serious MS can be. It is impossible to ignore the possibilities that may lie in wait but you have to remember that the risk of the very worst happening is extremely low.

worryMost people living with MS remain able to walk unassisted, while a smaller number need the help of a mobility aid. Indeed, many are able to continue working.

Only 25% of people with MS use a wheelchair or stay in bed because they are unable to walk, according to a survey completed before the new disease-modifying drugs became available.¹

I do need to use a wheelchair to get out and about because the amount I can walk is really limited to a very short distance. Even using a walking stick or cane, after 10 or 15 yards/metres I am forced to rest, preferably while sitting down. Similarly, standing is limited to a couple of minutes.

Steps can be taken only extremely slowly – both feet up to every step while holding on to the handrail. And that is only for three steps without help from someone else.

A wheelchair user I may be but even when needing to move further than I can walk, I do not consider myself confi.ned to my wheelchair; it is just a mobility tool to help get around when not driving my car. Indeed, my description of myself is ‘wheelchair enabled’.

The world-renowned Mayo Clinic² lists these complications that people with multiple sclerosis also may develop:

  • Muscle stiffness or spasms

Yes, have those.

  • Paralysis, typically in the legs

As I can still walk short distances, no I’m not paralysed

  • Problems with bladder, bowel or sexual function

Yes, have medications for those.

  • Mental changes, such as forgetfulness or mood swings

No brain fog or cognitive problems, no more forgetful now than ever, some ‘snappiness’ more than mood swings.

  • Depression

No, never had depression of any kind.

  • Epilepsy

    Yes, diagnosed with this 30 years before MS so hardly a complication. Medicated and fully under control with no seizure since 1975.

To sum it up, I don’t worry about what the future may bring, with or without MS. In fact, my own attitude to worry can best be encompassed by this quote from Dalai Lama XIV. He said:

If a problem is fixable, if a situation is such that you can do something about it, then there is no need to worry. If it’s not fixable, then there is no help in worrying. There is no benefit in worrying whatsoever.

 

¹ http://www.healthcentral.com/multiple-sclerosis/cf/slideshows/top-ten-common-myths-about-ms-busted#slide=4

² http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/multiple-sclerosis/symptoms-causes/dxc-20131884

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ian profile50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease/disorder-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Sharing life of caring wife of husband with MS

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Today, I have handed the writing over to my wife Lisa to talk about caring for a husband with multiple sclerosis.

Lisa writes:

Yesterday was a special day as Ian and I celebrated our wedding anniversary and enjoyed a lovely meal out in a great local restaurant here in Spain.

With Ian reaching his 64th birthday next week, and me being a few years younger, it may be surprising that yesterday was only our fifth anniversary. We have, obviously, both been married before.

carerI knew that my beloved had MS well before we tied the knot and knew what that could mean for both of us because my grandfather had it too.

As I am Ian’s wife, being his personal carer also falls to me. But that is not onerous to me, after all we are deeply in love and have a great sharing life; what I do as a carer is not a duty but a labour of love.

So, what is the care I give on a daily basis? There are actually too many to list in detail but I’ll just touch on the major ones.

Personal care

  1. Fastening/unfastening buttons
  2. Helping to shower
  3. Personal grooming

Living

  1. Preparation of all food and drinkH
  2. Cutting up anything large into bite-size pieces as Ian cannot hold both a knife and fork
  3. All household cleaning
  4. All laundry, including washing extra clothing because of bladder problems

Mobility

  1. Getting wheelchair out of and back into our car
  2. Pushing Ian about in his manual wheelchair prior to him getting his new electric one
  3. Helping him when walking using his cane

Then there are the times when Ian takes a tumble, whether by tripping or just his knee giving way. Generally, he manages to fall without hurting himself and, through determination and tenacity, somehow manages to get back to his feet unaided.  But there are certain times that he needs my help – and I have to be on hand to provide it.

Oh, yes, one last thing, the two of us have an agreement that when anything concerns his health, I have the final say.

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ian profile

50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Wheelchairs: Love to Have, Hate to Need

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Wheelchairs, scooters and I have a love/hate relationship. Not hate the actual chair, just the need to use one, hate the fact that my mobility is so badly affected by multiple sclerosis that walking, with a walking aid, any further than 10 to 15 yards is impossible without sitting down.

From that, you will probably realise the reason that various ways of getting around have played a part in my life in the last few years and will continue doing so.

Let’s start with scooters. There have been a couple. I remember using one for the first time, the feeling of independence was incredible. The first one bought from a mobility aids store was supposedly a mini sized model. It was certainly the smallest one on display but it was heavy and was difficult to lift into a car.

I next bought a smaller model that easily came apart to pack into a car but its batteries just weren’t up to the job, so that one was a second failure.

Next it was time to give wheelchairs a chance. I’ve had two manual ‘self-propelled’ chairs but as MS means I have very little strength on my left side, if trying to propel myself, the chair goes in left handed circles; forget a straight line. That meant my wife Lisa had to push me and, while that never bothered her, it meant that my independence was curtailed.

j-silver10jMy doctor back in the UK recommended that I have a motorized chair ad, in due course, it was available. It was supposedly foldable but to achieve that two heavy and bulky batteries had to be disconnected and removed and lots more. In fact, to collapse that chair took about 40 minutes with a similar time to put it together again. Simply impossible without meeting the expense of getting a vehicle especially adapted to carry it without collapsing the chair.

More recently, though, I have bought one of the lightweight, foldable wheelchairs being widely advertised online by Better Products for Disabled People. Here, pictured above, is the wheelchair I bought,

Finally, I have found the perfect match for my needs. It folds and unfolds in matters of seconds. It is compact enough when folded to go in the back of our car along with the weekly shopping and is light enough, just, for my wife to lift into and out of the car.

wheelchairs

Hey, that’s me in my new wheelchair in the HSCT centre in Moscow, with Dr Fedorenko and assistant Anastasia.

It has two sleek batteries that slide into the chair frame and is brilliant in use. It is easy to control, has the tightest of turning circles, in fact it can turn around in its own length, and can travel so far without recharging.

A couple of weeks ago, I took the chair with me to Moscow. As I was travelling alone, it made my life easy. Whether it was negotiating city streets, a bus station, hours in an airport waiting for the time for my flight, or travelling through the Moscow hospital’s maze of corridors, the new wheelchair coped and, eventually getting home, it still had more than half its charge. And no, I didn’t recharge it while away from home.

All in all, in my opinion, the BPDP wheelchair is the very best for my needs.

To see if it would suit you, just contact BPDP through its website or talk to Shaun Atkinson on Facebook.

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ian profile

50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Out and about by myself

By way of a change, I went out and about by myself yesterday morning. I went down our road, turned the corner and then quite some way down another road to see a couple with whom Lisa and I are friends.

The journey was well beyond my walking limit. I even have to sit down halfway from our door to the car in the drive and that is walking with the aid of a stick/cane. Any distance longer than that and Lisa has to  push me in my manual wheelchair. She doesn’t mind but it makes me feel so dependent

Yesterday, though, Lisa stayed at home and I went alone. It was exhilarating, it was fun.  No, I hadn’t made some sort of miraculous recovery.  wish I had but no, multiple sclerosis is still, regrettably, very much part of my life.

Yesterday’s freedom, and that was not the only example, was because I had just taken delivery of one of those fantastic all-singing, all-dancing lightweight folding electric wheelchairs. I had ordered one from Shaun Atkinson at Better Products for Disabled People it actually arrived on the promised day; amazing. My first impressions are that it is everything it is claimed to be – but I’ll be writing a full review once I have used it for a while.

06 blueI had already taken it out of our home, folded it up and somehow managed to place in in the back of the car. Today, it was taken it out of the car and unfolded it before I powered my way down to see our friends. Tremendous.

Then I reversed my journey and, having folded the chair, needed to sit down for a few minutes before having enough energy to lift it back into the car. But, in the end, I did just that.

Earlier, I used the wheelchair in our nearest town, when we went to see our doctor before enjoying breakfast in a local café bar.

As regular readers of this site know, I am travelling to Moscow this Sunday to undergo medical tests and assessment to determine whether or not I am likely to benefit from HSCT at a future date yet to be determined. My new chair is coming with me which will give me the independence I need in a foreign city.

 

 

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Wheelchair user’s dream: Motorized, foldable and lightweight

As regular readers will know, I am a bit of an advocate when it comes to accessibility and mobility issues and, from time to time, do address these subjects. Those subjects are of particular interest to me as I have to use a wheelchair as my mobility is severely restricted because of multiple sclerosis.

Occasionally, I come across something that simply deserves to be highlighted because it fulfills a need that people with disabilities have. For example, someone who needs a wheelchair to get about has a general choice of a manual or motorized one.

A manual one either has to be self-propelled, if the user is physically able to do so, or be pushed, so the wheelchair user has to relinquish independence and rely on someone else.

The alternative, as I have discovered, is not much better. Motorized wheelchairs are great to use, easy to maneuver and control and give the user the feeling of real independence. However, they have a major downside too – and that is their weight. They are so heavy.

In fact, anyone that uses a motorized chair and wants to take it to different places needs a specially adapted vehicle with either a hoist, ramp or elevator platform to load the chair on board.

BUT, there is an answer to the problem. There are now good quality, lightweight, folding motorized chairs that make the old problems disappear:

  • They give the user the independence provided by all motorized chairs;06 blue
  • They fold-up in seconds to go in the boot (trunk) of even a small car;
  • They are light enough to be lifted easily into and out of a car by one person;
  • Their batteries simply pull out in seconds to be transported separately on aircraft;
  • They are light enough to be carried on and off tenders if the user is going on a cruise holiday.

Talking of cruises, here is a report from Emma. She had just taken delivery of one such folding motorized chair from Better Products for Disabled People. This is her story:

Earlier this month my husband and I set off on our first ever cruise, heading to the Norwegian Fjords. We had been recommended cruising for its excellent accessibility but had no idea what it would be like.

We were taking my new folding motorized wheelchair but were concerned after the warnings from the cruise company about narrow doors and door thresholds. We need not have worried.

For a week I had more freedom than I’ve had at any point since my MS took most of my eyesight; I could navigate the ship just fine, the wheelchair took it all in its stride. Door thresholds were no problem; narrow corridors and doors were only an issue because of my lack of sight and skill and I improved quickly.

The battery handled it brilliantly; I spent at least eight hours a day in the wheelchair zooming around deck, attending shows, going to meals or out on excursions and never had a single problem.

What I did have were lots of admiring glances which turned into questions about where I got my wheelchair from and how I like it. Who would have thought I would be a travelling sales woman? BPDP folding electric wheelchair you are an international lifesaver.

Now, you cannot say better than that. Much to the relief of my wife, Lisa, my BPDP chair is on order. When it arrives, we’ll have the best of both worlds. I’ll get my independence back as I use a motorized chair and it will come out and go back into the car as simply as a manual chair.

 

Better Products for Disabled People <<http://better-products-for-disabled-people.myshopify.com>>

 

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