Home from Moscow, strangely contented

Yesterday was a long and tiring day, returning home to the sunny and south of Spain from the colder temperatures found in Moscow.

With the help of two members of the support team, I left the hospital at 7am, which was 6am in Spain, eventually getting home at 10.30pm. Believe me, 16½ hours of travelling and layovers is a tiring experience which is probably why it was gone midday before today woke me from my slumbers.

Being in Russia, in the AA Maximov HSCT clinic, was an experience I am glad to have had, but nothing comes up to the delight brought about by being home again. Home with Lisa, the love of my life.

In the clinic, bonds are quickly established between patients at various stages of the process and, even though only there for assessment, I immediately found myself welcomed as one of the community.  And I now have new Facebook friends so we need never lose touch.

MRI brain scan. This is a stock picture,not one of mine,

MRI brain scan. This is a stock picture,not one of mine.

Several people have sent me comments since my assessment result was revealed – that I would not be accepted to have HSCT. Some have said how sorry they are that I cannot have the treatment; others have expressed their pleasure that the MRI scans showed that my lesions are inactive and that my future is looking good according to Moscow’s Dr Fedorenko.

So, how do I feel? Strangely, contented.

The fact that my lesions, which exist in both brain and spine, are inactive is great news in itself. And to have Dr F tell me that my prognosis for MS is no, or in the worst case very slow, progress is something that I had never dreamed could happen.

So, in short, I am in a good position.

On top of that, I had so many checks on various internal organs that I know now exactly what is wrong in much more detail than before.  The scans, x-rays and other tests – also show that there is nothing unwanted, nothing that should not be there.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.

Moscow calling – day three

Wednesday marks the halfway point in my journey of tests and clinical assessment at the AA Maximov centre in Moscow. Of course, I am looking forward to getting the results, although the MRI scan results are known already.

The programme of tests is not complete yet but most are now behind me.

Yesterday was the most intensive day of the week, with tests on my urine and blood, lungs, x-rays, ultrasound and the 24-hour cardiac monitor that was removed in my room this morning before I even got out of bed.

My left knee gave way last night, in my room, meaning that there was a close encounter with the floor. This is nothing unusual for me but it caused consternation among the staff, one of whom was just passing my door when It happened. Even though it was nothing out of the ordinary for me, it was still the first thing that Dr Fedorenko talked about when he visited me this morning.

mriMore importantly, part of that discussion concerned the results of my MRI scan from two days ago. It’s important to remember that this was the first such test since my diagnosis 14 years ago.

The scan showed lesions, some quite large he said, but added that they are not active.

Active lesions, those that are just forming or expanding, can cause a wide variety of symptoms, depending on where they are located and how big they are. Inactive means exactly that, they are not growing and so the MS symptoms should not be increasing nor worsening significantly.

I know that results of the MRI scan mean that HSCT is unlikely for me, as active lesions are almost always a prerequisite of the treatment. Still, news that there are no active lesions needs to be looked at positively.

Dr F is not expecting my symptoms to deteriorate quickly or at any time soon.

Another positive outcome of this series of tests is that I will have received the most thorough, most comprehensive, health check of my life so far. I say ‘will have’ because they are not finished yet.

More news tomorrow.

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, who is Managing Editor (columns division) of BioNews Services. BioNews is owner of 50 disease-specific news and information websites – including MS News Today. Ian has enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor, in the print media. During that career he gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. He was diagnosed with MS in 2002 but continued working until mobility problems forced him to retire early in late 2006. He now lives in the south of Spain. Besides MS, Ian is also able to write about both epilepsy and cardiovascular matters from a patient’s perspective and is a keen advocate on mobility and accessibility issues.