Give people with PPMS the treatment they need, MS Society campaign #SpeakupforMS

Blocking of a drug as a treatment for primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS), making it unavailable for use by the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), is being challenged by the country’s MS Society.

And it has coupled its opposition with a call to arms – inviting everyone to #SpeakupforMS.

#SpeakupforMS

Holly (Pic: MS Society).

Holly, from the society’s campaigns community, lives with PPMS. She says: “The first licensed treatment for my condition has been denied approval to be available on the NHS in England and Wales.

#SpeakupforMS“Ocrelizumab (Ocrevus) has proven it can reduce the risk of disability getting worse for people like me with early primary progressive MS.

“But the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has rejected it because it says its (the drug’s) costs are too high for its benefits.

Need to #SpeakupforMS

“We need to speak up together.

“We need to tell Roche, NICE and NHS England: give people with primary progressive MS access to ocrelizumab.”

You can add your voice to the campaign today by signing the MS Society’s petition here

#SpeakupforMSHolly continues: “We‘ve been waiting a lifetime for an effective treatment for primary progressive MS. This decision is crucial.

“Right now, this is just for approval in England and Wales, but any delay in making ocrelizumab available could have knock-on effects across the UK.”

According to the society, every year around 600 people are diagnosed with primary progressive MS in the UK. 

Holly asks for your suppport.

She says: “Join us and #SpeakUpforMS.”

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50shadesofsun.com is the personal website of Ian Franks, a freelance medical writer and editor for various health information sites. He enjoyed a successful career as a journalist, from reporter to editor in the print media. He gained a Journalist of the Year award in his native UK. Ian received a diagnosis of MS in 2002 and now lives in the south of Spain. He uses a wheelchair and advocates on mobility and accessibility issues.

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Note: Health-related information available on 50shadesofsun website is for your general knowledge only. It is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. I am not a doctor, so cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues. Also, consult a doctor before starting a new diet or exercise programme. Any opinions expressed are purely my own unless otherwise stated.